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Released by Pak, 40 Indians reach home

Forty Indians reached home late on Saturday night after being released by the Pakistani government. The 40 persons released by Pakistan at 11:50pm on Saturday included 35 fishermen, who claimed to be coping well.

punjab Updated: Dec 01, 2014 00:36 IST
Aseem Bassi

Forty Indians reached home late on Saturday night after being released by the Pakistani government.

The 40 persons released by Pakistan at 11:50pm on Saturday included 35 fishermen, who claimed to be coping well.

However, the five others claimed to have gone through immense torture in Pakistani prisons.

A few among the released civilians, who were in shock, could not narrate the 'tales of horror' coherently.

Zafar-Ud-Din, a native of Etah in Uttar Pradesh, was unable to share information about his profession, trip to Pakistan and his eventual arrest.

Another civilian Mangal Singh, however, was prompt enough to disclose his name.

But, he was unable to recall his residential address.

Mubarak Hussain, a native of Kupwara in Jammu and Kashmir, vividly remembers the pain he went through during more than five years of jail in Pakistan.

He said: "I had gone to the Line of Control to do some fencing work. Suddenly, I was captured by militants across the border and handed over to the ISI. I was kept in an interrogation cell for two years and subjected to all sorts of torture."

Hussain, who was nursing an injured leg, said, "My blood was collected and fed to the dogs. This homecoming is the best thing that has happened to me now. I wish to start a new life again."

Another civilian, Yogesh Kumar, who hails from Dhandauri in Madhya Pradesh and was caught nearly three months ago, was reluctant to share his tale.

However, the other 35 fishermen, who are natives of Gujarat, appeared to be fine.

Officials from Gujarat had already reached Amritsar to take them home.

One of the fishermen Nanji (who goes by his first name only), said, "I spent around a year in prison. We were not subjected to any torture and were looked after well. The fishermen go to the sea to earn a livelihood but since there is no demarcation, some enter Pakistani waters and are caught."