Sikh community extends more help as UK flood situation worsens | punjab | Hindustan Times
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Sikh community extends more help as UK flood situation worsens

Britain’s Sikh community has extended more aid and deployed more volunteers, as thousands of homes in Wales and elsewhere remained without power due to storms of over 100 mph, and continuing breaching of river embankments in other places.

punjab Updated: Feb 13, 2014 21:04 IST
Prasun Sonwalkar

Britain’s Sikh community has extended more aid and deployed more volunteers, as thousands of homes in Wales and elsewhere remained without power due to storms of over 100 mph, and continuing breaching of river embankments in other places.

Slough-based Khalsa aid, which was one of the first NGOs on the ground in Somerset, a county in South West England, has now extended its relief efforts in Berkshire, particularly in the worst-affected villages of Datchet and Wraysbury.

Road and rail continued to be closed in some areas as Britain braced for more inclement weather over the weekend. Two people were reported dead due to weather-related incidents, as the David Cameron government allocated new funding to deal with the crisis.

Khalsa aid’s work has been appreciated by the affected people as volunteers from Bedford, Walsall, Birmingham and Leicester, who recently returned after working in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan, joined the relief efforts.

The team also rescued several animals, Khalsa aid said.

Ravinder Singh Sidhu, director of Khalsa aid, said: “Our volunteers are humbled by the immense support and messages of appreciation."

Bal Kaur Sandhu, a representative of the organisation, said: "Khalsa aid are spreading their wings in other parts of the country. We recognise the need to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with our communities and support them."

"We will be operating in Datchet, Colnbrook and Wraysbury and are appealing to volunteers to assist Khalsa aid – hands on assistance is needed in all three areas", Sandhu said.

Khalsa aid said they did selfless ‘seva’ (service) through humanitarian aid work, drawing inspiration from Guru Gobind Singh who taught to “recognise the entire human race as one”.