‘Saakhi’ to connect young generation to the life of Sikh Gurus | punjab$htcity | Hindustan Times
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‘Saakhi’ to connect young generation to the life of Sikh Gurus

“I felt a need to contribute in some way to the younger generation who is deprived of listening to the Saakhi’s (stories) related to the ten Sikh Guru’s and thus I have come up with an mobile application called ‘Saakhi’ which would connect them to the life histories of the Sikh Guru’s,” says Bahrain-based Gurpreet Singh over a telephonic interview with Hindustan Times.

punjab Updated: Nov 22, 2015 11:35 IST
Usmeet Kaur
Sikh

In Saakhi, stories are presented as audio files and not in written form. It contains short audio stories of four-to-six minutes each.(HT Photo )

“I felt a need to contribute in some way to the younger generation who is deprived of listening to the Saakhi’s (stories) related to the ten Sikh Guru’s and thus I have come up with a mobile application called ‘Saakhi’ which would connect them to the life histories of the Sikh Guru’s,” says Bahrain-based Gurpreet Singh over a telephonic interview with Hindustan Times.

“Today the Sikh community is passing through a turbulent phase because we are getting detached from the rich history and teachings of the Gurus which are imbibed in the Sri Guru Granth Sahib,” adds Gurpreet, who was born and brought up in Jalandhar and now lives with his family in Bahrain and is working as business manger in a food company .

Singh took long years to compile the knowledge base for this mobile application but technically it took him three months to launch it.

While elaborating on the need to launch this application, he says, “There is decadence in our society because the bedtime saakhis (stories) that we heard from our grand-parents are no longer being passed to the next generation. However, now the tech-savvy youth can directly be in touch with the history by downloading the mobile app.” he says.

“In Saakhi, stories are presented as audio files and not in written form. It contains short audio stories of four-to-six minutes each. Users can listen to one story everyday along with their children. Each story ends with a short message to make the learning relevant to modern times. A folder of ‘Sawaal-Jawaab’ (FAQ’s) is also there, with frequently-asked questions on the Sikh way of life. Interestingly, I have added a section of photography on Sikh parenting,” he reveals.