Amritsar-based students’ group to step up efforts for release of Nanak from Pak jail | punjab | Hindustan Times
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Amritsar-based students’ group to step up efforts for release of Nanak from Pak jail

As per information, Nanak is now close to 40, and is lodged in Lahore’s Kot Lakhpat Jail, where he is known as Kakar Singh.

punjab Updated: Feb 27, 2017 10:48 IST
Usmeet Kaur
Student federation president Keshav Kohli (Right) along with the father(Centre)and brother (Left) of Nanak Singh who is in a Pakistan jail, in Amritsar on Sunday.
Student federation president Keshav Kohli (Right) along with the father(Centre)and brother (Left) of Nanak Singh who is in a Pakistan jail, in Amritsar on Sunday.(Sameer Sehgal /Hindustan Times)

After external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj sought a report from the Indian high commission in Islamabad on Nanak Singh, who reportedly strayed into the neighbouring country in 1984 when he was 7, an Amritsar-based student federation has come out in support of the family. 

As per information, Nanak is now close to 40, and is lodged in Lahore’s Kot Lakhpat Jail, where he is known as Kakar Singh.

The student activists said if there was no response from the high commission, they, along with Nanak’s family members, will go to meet the minister and also to Pakistan, if permitted. 

The students slammed the state government for not supporting the family. “The government should have taken up the issue with the Centre to get Nanak released,” said Keshav Kohli, president of the federation. 

He said they will support the family as Nanak’s parents were illiterate and unaware of legal matters, policies and procedures.  “We have been standing by the family since 2015 and had met Sushma Swaraj in this regard. We have been raising the issue on social media and trying to contact Pakistan-based NGO Tehreek-e-Insaf party’s activist Rai Azizullah for help,” said district president Aditya Sharma. 

 Nanak’s father Rattan Singh said at that time, the border had only barbed fence and incidents of straying were common.  “I have never seen my eldest brother (Nanak Singh) but have heard my parents talking about him,” said Jagtar Singh, 17, Nanak’s brother. 

In 2002, a ray of hope came for the family when cops from the Ramdas police station told Rattan Singh that his son was in a Pakistan jail and known as Kakar Singh. “But since then we are just waiting,” Rattan said.