This cranberry tree big attraction for Sikh pilgrims at Patna gurdwara | punjab$regional-takes | Hindustan Times
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This cranberry tree big attraction for Sikh pilgrims at Patna gurdwara

A sacred cranberry tree is proving to be a major attraction among devotees visiting Gurdwara Bal Leela Maini Sangat on the 350th Parkash Parv of Guru Gobind Singh.

punjab Updated: Jan 03, 2017 12:10 IST
Anirban Guha Roy
The tree is associated with the tenth Sikh guru, as is revealed by a plaque installed.
The tree is associated with the tenth Sikh guru, as is revealed by a plaque installed.(HT Photo)

A sacred cranberry tree is proving to be a major attraction among devotees visiting Gurdwara Bal Leela Maini Sangat on the 350th Parkash Parv of Guru Gobind Singh.

The tree is associated with the tenth Sikh guru, as is revealed by a plaque installed here. It reads that a stem of the tree was sown by the guru during his childhood, and he used its twigs to brush his teeth.

Guru Gobind Singh also blessed the tree, and the needy — who don’t have any offspring or suffer from physical disease — would have their wishes fulfilled if they ate the cranberry after praying, reads the plaque.

“It’s a piece of history I did not know about,” said Pankaj Singh, a local who was seen sitting near the plaque, taking pictures with his family. Rumi Kumari, a college-goer, said the cranberry tree legend had turned her first visit to the gurdwara into a memorable experience.

If taking selfies is a ubiquitous sight at the gurdwaras, visitors are no less impressed with the lighting arrangements at the venues of the Parkash Parv at Patna, where even streets and public grounds have been tastefully decorated.

“I simply loved the ambience here. The spectacular lighting of the buildings is a treat to the eyes,” Kumari said, adding she could not wait to post her pictures on Facebook.

The Parkash Parv has turned into a must-see for localites, with people planning trips with their families late in the night, braving cold to visit the Harmandir Saheb, the birth place of the tenth Guru.

“Patna should have more such events as they teach a lot about our rich history,” said Neelamni Kumar, a senior citizen, who had come from Frazer road with his family. “What I really liked was the langar serving food to thousands of people each day,” he said.