Tipplers use WhatsApp to outsmart UT cops and avoid being challaned | punjab$chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Tipplers use WhatsApp to outsmart UT cops and avoid being challaned

Vikas, a sales professional, finishes his third drink in one gulp at a bar in the Elante Mall where he had a meeting with his client. As he takes his leave, Vikas pulls out his cell phone, opens WhatsApp, keys in some words and in next few minutes he’s ready to drive down.

punjab Updated: Oct 09, 2016 12:30 IST
Gurpreet Singh Chhina

Vikas, a sales professional, finishes his third drink in one gulp at a bar in the Elante Mall where he had a meeting with his client. As he takes his leave, Vikas pulls out his cell phone, opens WhatsApp, keys in some words and in next few minutes he’s ready to drive down.

To be doubly sure, he again glances at his WhatsApp chat: “Weather clear from Elante to 22…Naka at 33/34…All clear from 35 to Mohali.” Now, he has his route map ready, which is different from his usual route — where the cops have set up a naka as he just got to know. There are half-a-dozen nakas on his way, but Vikas is able to reach home in SAS Nagar without encountering even one of these.

Despite the UT Police having stepped up its drive to check drunken driving, he’s been outsmarting them, all thanks to his WhatsApp group. The ‘virtual gathering’ is thus is his unfailing source of nakas set up by the cops across the city.

Each of the 256 members (that’s the maximum a WhatsApp group can have) in the group dutifully updates information of all nakas they come across.

The information from different nakas from all these persons ensures none of them are challaned, even though they are a few drinks down.

WhatsApp has come a big respite to the Bachhus’ lovers. The tricity has several groups which has people drawn in from different sectors. Many women are also active members of these groups.

There are rules though. For instance, greetings or forwarded messages aren’t allowed. They mean business: ‘Info on nakas only’.”

Many give information in codes. Like, ‘all-clear’ means ‘no nakas’; unsurprisingly, ‘Bad Weather’ means heavy nakas.

The names of such groups vary from obvious ones like ‘Traffic Update’ and ‘Daru nakas’ to more sober ones like ‘Weather Today’. Not that the cops are unaware of such groups. “But what can we do about this,” said a traffic police officer.