To ‘nail’ old problem, magnet in stomach of cows, buffaloes!

  • Arjun Sharma, Hindustan Times, Ludhiana
  • Updated: Sep 23, 2016 20:30 IST
At least two cases of metal-piece consumption by cows and buffaloes are reported at the varsity hospital every day, say officials. The metal pieces damage internal organs and lead to loss of milk yield and also death. (HT File Photo)

To counter the problem of cows and buffaloes swallowing nails and suffering health problems — and not giving enough milk — the veterinary university here has come up with a technique to put a magnet in the animal’s stomach. This will attract the nails and other such objects that the animals swallow when accidentally mixed in fodder or otherwise, which will be removed periodically, say experts at the Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (GADVASU).

At least two cases of metal-piece consumption by cows and buffaloes are reported at the varsity hospital every day, say officials. The metal pieces damage internal organs and lead to loss of milk yield and also death.

The innovative technique, in which a cylindrical magnet is placed inside the stomach of a cow or buffalo with the help of a two-foot pipe, was launched at the two-day Pashu Palan Mela (animal husbandry fair) that concluded at the university on Friday.

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“Cows and buffaloes do not always chew the fodder completely. They swallow parts that may include waste material such as nails, other construction material and even metal wires,” explained Dr Ashwani Kumar, professor of veterinary medicine at GADVASU. “These metal pieces can damage the heart, liver and even lungs of the animals, causing death within a short time of consumption.”

At present, in such cases, the university scans the body of the animal with the help of ultrasound and uses targeted surgery. If the animal has the magnet as per the new technology, only that magnet will be removed surgically, every two to three years.

“The magnet technology is a boon for farmers, but must be inserted with the help of veterinary experts,” said Dr Harish Kumar Verma, director, extension education, GADVASU. It is available at the university hospital for Rs 200.

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