Train doctors from region to lessen burden on PGIMER: Dr Jagat Ram | punjab$chandigarh | Hindustan Times
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Train doctors from region to lessen burden on PGIMER: Dr Jagat Ram

As the governments of adjoining states have nearly failed to manage their patients, the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) is planning to train the faculty of medical colleges of neighbouring states.

punjab Updated: Apr 09, 2017 15:12 IST
Tanbir Dhaliwal
PGIMER

Director PGIMER, Dr Jagat Ram.(HT file Photo)

As the governments of adjoining states have nearly failed to manage their patients, the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) is planning to train the faculty of medical colleges of neighbouring states.

The idea was floated by a Dr MR Dogra, professor, Advanced Eye Centre, PGIMER to Dr Jagat Ram, director PGIMER recently.

“The director has agreed to the concept and has said that the institute will start working on the proposal,” said Dr MR Dogra.

Talking about the increasing patient load, Dr Dogra said, “On commencement of the Advanced Eye Centre in 2006, nearly 250 cases were examined daily, but today the number has surged to 2,000 cases per day and the number is ever increasing.”

He added, “No public hospital in the north India expect Delhi runs a retina clinic. As a result, I end up examining more than 500 patients daily. The load will intensify further, if no concrete steps are taken.”

PGIMER witnesses an increase of nearly 2 lakh patients annually. Majority of cases are referred from adjoining states of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir and adjacent states.

“Even those cases are being referred which can be operated in primary hospitals. The doctors posted there are not properly trained and are hesitant to take up the treatment,” he said.

To ensure that PGIMER is relived of the undesired load, Dr Dogra suggested that a three to six month training programme should be initiated by PGIMER for the faculty employed in the medical colleges of neighbouring states.

“Once the faculty of medical colleges is trained in treating complicated cases of various specialty areas, the faculty in turn can train their students. By this, patient referrals can be checked to some extent,” he said.

“Training of faculties is very common in south India, but the practice is lacking in North India. PGIMER will only have to make arrangements for boarding and lodging of such professors,” he said.

The doctor has also suggested that the PGIMER should increase the number of sponsored seats from adjoining states.

“Every state sponsors few doctors for superspeciality training in PGIMER. These seats should be increased, so that more number of doctors from the region can be trained,” he added.

Earlier, Dr Jagat Ram, director, PGIMER had also suggested that he will start training programmes for doctors from adjoining states to check unwanted referrals.