When a truck crushed a biker in Mohali: Could he be saved? Maybe not. Shouldn’t we even try? | punjab | Hindustan Times
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When a truck crushed a biker in Mohali: Could he be saved? Maybe not. Shouldn’t we even try?

What will you say if during the golden hour, the police instead of trying to rescue the injured get busy shooting videos, clicking photographs, with some of them sitting comfortably in PCR vans, even as passersby come forward to try to rescue the victim?

punjab Updated: Mar 25, 2017 18:53 IST
Mukesh Rawat
Abhishek Dubey (32) was crushed after an overloaded truck overturned and fell on him on the airport road in SAS Nagar on March 20 night when he was returning home on his motorcycle.
Abhishek Dubey (32) was crushed after an overloaded truck overturned and fell on him on the airport road in SAS Nagar on March 20 night when he was returning home on his motorcycle.

What if it takes more than an hour after countless pleadings for the police to call for a crane and start a rescue operation after a road accident has taken place?

And what if this happens at a stone’s throw from a city which happens to be the capital of two states and is also a union territory?

What will you say if during the golden hour, the police instead of trying to rescue the injured get busy shooting videos, clicking photographs, with some of them sitting comfortably in PCR vans, even as passersby come forward to try to rescue the victim?

On the intervening night of March 20 and 21, when we were returning from office at 1:45am, a crowd had gathered at the light-point on the airport road near the Radha Soami Satsang ashram, Sector 76, SAS Nagar.

A truck loaded with sand had overturned, crushing under it a motorcycle. The truck driver escaped unhurt, while passersby were trying to rescue the biker, Abhishek Dubey (32), whose name we knew only the next day from newspaper columns. Abhishek was a native of Allahabad in Uttar Pradesh and worked as a supervisor here.

Chances of his survival were indeed bleak.

The fact that he was wearing a helmet and there was 1.5-foot gap between the ground and the part of the truck under where he was stuck provided a small ray of hope.

The police personnel present were requested several times, but it took over an hour for the crane to arrive.

In the meantime, some of us tried to empty the truck filled with sand. Others arranged hydraulic jacks from trucks passing by to try and lift the truck. But all in vain.

As much as it was encouraging to see Good Samaritans in action, it was equally heartbreaking to see the nonchalant cops. For those 10-12 policemen who came in PCR vans, it appeared to be business as usual. They clicked photographs and took small notes. That was it.

Worse, some did not even bother to step out of PCR vans and kept chatting inside the vehicles. The victim died. But the question that remained was — could he be saved?

Maybe not. But shouldn’t the cops have shown an urgency to rescue him?

When I shifted from New Delhi six months ago, I was impressed by the wide roads in Chandigarh and its neighbouring cities.

The city’s planners were farsighted enough to get made slip roads for an effective traffic management. Not only this, I was happy to see dedicated bicycle tracks at many places.

But despite this all, road accidents are rampant here, with speeding and drunken driving being a routine affair.

The National Crime Records Bureau in its latest report on accidental deaths in 2015 says that Chandigarh witnessed a 12.8% rise in road accidents over the previous year.

Chandigarh and its neighbouring cities must aspire to have safer roads.