When three maestros of Kirana Gharana swayed audience | punjab$dont-miss | Hindustan Times
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When three maestros of Kirana Gharana swayed audience

The music lovers of the city witnessed an evening of soul-touching singing as Pandit Vishwanath of the Kirana Gharana performed at a baithak hosted by Triveni Sangeet Sabha at Shringar, Sector 16, on Sunday.

punjab Updated: Dec 07, 2015 10:15 IST
Neeru Saharan
Pandit Vishwanath with his sons, vocalist Manu Maharaj (left) and shehnai artiste Bhaskarnath (right).
Pandit Vishwanath with his sons, vocalist Manu Maharaj (left) and shehnai artiste Bhaskarnath (right).(Keshav Singh/HT Photo)

The music lovers of the city witnessed an evening of soul-touching singing as Pandit Vishwanath of the Kirana Gharana performed at a baithak hosted by Triveni Sangeet Sabha at Shringar, Sector 16, on Sunday.

Accompanied by his sons — Manu Maharaj as vocalist and Bhaskarnath on shehnai — Vishwanath pitched his heart out with the notes of Hindustani classical music. The mesmerising ragas and the popular thumri took the listeners into a trance.

Accomplished percussionist Parvez Hussain, who belongs to the Ajrada Gharana, made the presentation lively with his tabla beats. The event was supported by the Haryana government. Haryana additional chief secretary (cultural affairs) Vijayvardhan was present.

Born in Meerut to a family of renowned musicians, Pandit Vishwanath is master of the ‘Banarsi dhun’, ‘kajri’ and ‘tappa’. Both his sons are disciples of Pandit Jasraj and perform in prestigious festivals in India and abroad.

All three of the family are A-grade artistes of the All-India Radio (AIR). In a chat with HT, Pandit Vishwanath recalled his childhood days and how his father and grandfather would submerge themselves in the Ganga river and find the sali leaf that goes into making shehnai.

The trigalbandi was the artistes’ 60th performance, which owes credit to noted singer and AIR artiste Primila Puri, a disciple of Ustad Munawwar Ali Khan. In 1999, Puri formed Triveni Sangeet Sabha with city artistes to promote classical art forms.

The organisation’s name, said Puri, was inspired by a tree in her friend’s garden, which has three different roots — of peepal, banyan and neem.

Puri insists on familiarising the younger generation with classical music, supported in this by her daughters, kathak exponent Nandita Puri and singer Chandrika Budhiraja.