New Punjabi song glorifies ‘reach’ behind bars: ‘Will call you from jail... update Facebook too’ | punjab | Hindustan Times
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New Punjabi song glorifies ‘reach’ behind bars: ‘Will call you from jail... update Facebook too’

Sung by Mankirt Aulakh and penned by Inder Pandori, the song that’s gone viral on YouTube projects the “jatt” as a superhero who takes pride in the gun culture and his connections with gangsters. “Na parkhi paunch jatt di” — a loose translation says, “If you mess with us, don’t keep any doubts about our reach.”

punjab Updated: Aug 06, 2017 19:46 IST
Shub Karman Dhaliwal
The song that’s gone viral on YouTube projects the “jatt” as a superhero who takes pride in the gun culture and his connections with gangsters.
The song that’s gone viral on YouTube projects the “jatt” as a superhero who takes pride in the gun culture and his connections with gangsters.(YouTube)

Jails ain’t such a bad thing, after all! That’s what this new Punjabi song wants you to believe, attaching a sense of pride with being behind bars or even knowing someone who’s in jail.

The song — ‘Jail vichon phone aaunge’ — has a man boasting how his enemies would get calls from inside the jail. It underlines how jail inmates in the state are able to use mobile phones with impunity. Many gangsters behind bars regularly update their Facebook pages, which too has been glorified in the song.

Sung by Mankirt Aulakh and penned by Inder Pandori, the song that’s gone viral on YouTube projects the “jatt” as a superhero who takes pride in the gun culture and his connections with gangsters. ‘Na parkheen paunch jatt di’ — a loose translation says, “If you mess with us, don’t keep any doubts about our reach.”

The video even features Indo-Canadian Ranjit Dara Aujla, a promoter of a kabaddi club in Toronto and hails from Mothada Kalan village in Jalandhar, whose name has surfaced in drug cases. The singer too is no stranger to the law. The Haryana police had in March this year booked Aulakh for alleged involvement in a land grabbing case in a village of Fatehabad district. Mankirt hails from Behabalpur village of Fatehabad and is presently living in Canada.

Another lyric tells the “enemies” that the “hero” has not “stooped so low that he will use the name of DC (deputy commissioner) to give a threat”. After a couple of stanzas, it says, ‘Chalaun Facebook andron, bane jailan de shingaar ne’, which means “they openly use Facebook inside the jail, and their presence graces jails”.

The music is given by Deep Jandu and the song is produced by Speed Records.

The 25-year-old lyricist, who hails from Pandori Ganga Singh village of Hoshiarpur district, told HT, “I used to have friends who were lodged in jails, and I would visit them. Whatever I have written is in the public domain, as everyone knows that gangsters are using phones inside prisons and updating their social networking sites.”

He claimed he had joined the army in 2013 but left it, “as my inclination is towards singing and writing”. His first song came out in 2014, and now he wants to turn a singer too by the end of the year. He hastens to add that he has written religious song too “which will be out soon”.

Jails were a theme in another recent song praising the “daring act” of the Nabha jailbreak.