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Jharkhand university develops hardier pig breed

The Jharsuk breed has a faster growth, lower maintenance cost, better feed conversion rate and better reproductive performance than indigenous breeds.

ranchi Updated: Oct 25, 2016 15:59 IST
Anil Kumar
The Jharsuk breed is expected to give farmers four to five times higher economic returns than normal pigs.
The Jharsuk breed is expected to give farmers four to five times higher economic returns than normal pigs.(HT Photo)

The Birsa Agricultural University (BAU), under the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR)-supported All India Coordinated Research Project, has developed a new breed of pigs.

The Jharsuk breed, with black lustrous skin, faster growth, lower maintenance cost, better feed conversion rate and reproductive performance, higher survivability, disease resistance and ecological adaptability, will give farmers four to five times higher economic returns.

BAU vice chancellor Dr Nitin Madan Kulkarni said the Centre has set a target to double the income of farmers by 2022, which cannot be achieved by improved crop varieties and increased dose of fertilisers only.

“The promotion of allied activities like piggery is essential for increased farm income. Piggery is very popular in at least 10 districts of Jharkhand and the state government has sanctioned 1,000 pig units for the current fiscal,” he said.

“Gone are the days when people looked at pig farming with contempt and now even IIT and IIM graduates are considering it a profitable enterprise,” he said.

ICAR deputy director general (animal science) Dr H Rahman said the Jharsuk will play an important role in ensuring nutritional security in Jharkhand.

“Jharkhand is dependent on other states for egg and meat requirement. Since pig farming is coming up as a promising industry, cooperative societies should also be set up for pig farmers on the line of dairy farmers and goat farmers,” he said, adding that the target of doubling the farmers’ income cannot be achieved without integrating the goat, pig, sheep and backyard poultry in the farming system.