Jharkhand IPS officers take to celluloid to break Maoist ranks | ranchi | Hindustan Times
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Jharkhand IPS officers take to celluloid to break Maoist ranks

It’s a given they know how to shoot, but a dozen IPS officers in Jharkhand proved they can act too.

ranchi Updated: Nov 07, 2015 16:09 IST
B Vijay Murty
Pratyavartan is probably one of India’s first full-length films that has several policemen, including at least a dozen IPS officers, playing various characters barring that of the lead actor and actress.
Pratyavartan is probably one of India’s first full-length films that has several policemen, including at least a dozen IPS officers, playing various characters barring that of the lead actor and actress.

It’s a given they know how to shoot, but a dozen IPS officers in Jharkhand proved they can act too.

They form the main cast of a feature film, Pratyavartan-The Home Coming, made by Jharkhand police to send across a message to the leaders and cadres of left-wing extremist groups, asking them to shun the path of violence and surrender.

The brainchild of former director general of police (DGP) Rajiv Kumar, who is the present DG of home guard and fire department, Pratyavartan is probably one of India’s first full-length films that has several policemen, including at least a dozen IPS officers, playing various characters barring that of the lead actor and actress.

“The film carries a very strong message and I am hopeful it would keep you hooked to your seats for the entire two hours and 14 minutes,” said Kumar on the sidelines of the preparation for the maiden screening of the film at Ranchi’s Fun Cinema on Thursday.

Envisaged in early 2013, the film, funded by the Centre and directed by a production house in West Bengal, was completed by November 2014. The film, shot extensively in various picturesque locales of Jharkhand, mainly in Netarhat, got the Censor Board’s ‘U” Certificate in 2015.

The film opens with a press conference where journalists fire questions at the DGP (Rajiv Kumar) about the ambitious ‘Surrender Policy’ for the rebels and why he felt Maoists would want to surrender by taking the benefits.

The DGP replies that corruption has penetrated Red ranks and their cause was no longer relevant.

It then moves on to Surathia, who is raped by three men and dumped in the jungle from where a young Maoist guerilla, Suraj, takes her to his home.

Gradually the two fall in love and marry. Things take an ugly turn when Suraj’s boss Chandan, a Maoist commander, starts digging grave for him.

The crux of the film is about how people claiming to be fighting an ideological war have moved away from the path and didn’t care for love, human relations and humanity.

The breathtaking locales and some good acting by the star cast make the film intense and worth watching.