Hinterland ought to be explored for stories: Thithi director Raam Reddy | regional movies | Hindustan Times
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Hinterland ought to be explored for stories: Thithi director Raam Reddy

regional-movies Updated: Sep 05, 2016 18:47 IST
Highlight Story

Thithi is a National Award-winning Kannada film directed Raam Reddy. (ThithiTheFilm/Facebook)

Director Raam Reddy’s Kannada-language drama film Thithi, which won a National Award this year, was screened at the 1st BRICS Film Festival in New Delhi on Saturday. Speaking at the fest, the director said all the countries present at the fest were so diverse that the hinterland and their uniqueness needed to be explored.

The 1st BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) Film Festival, which is part of the special events planned in the run-up to the 8th BRICS Summit to be held in India next month, kick-off here at Siri Fort Auditorium Complex on Friday.

And on the second day, at a panel discussion titled Stories From Hinterland, Going Global, Reddy opined that there is an immense amount of raw talent in the small unexplored lands that are wanting to tell something unique.

“Realism is a style, it’s something in India that captivated me. Diverse and interesting in so many ways. In hinterlands if you are collaborating with people, they are natural,” Reddy said, adding that he also collaborated with people from the villages, behind the camera.

Reddy is best known for his National Award-winning film Thithi, but has also impressed many with his short films including Ika -- a Telugu short film.

“The countries that have come together for this festival are so diverse, with so much of diversity within each of their own countries that we need to go into the hinterlands. We need to start exploring the real heroes,” he said.

Raam Reddy with Shyam Benegal. (Raam.reddy/Facebook)

Reddy also finds the common man interesting, and has had a number of real life people portraying themselves.

“I found the common man very cinematic and wanted them to be on the screen. I also like to work with people whom I know in some way. In ‘Ika’, children from a slum community who were attending a school that my mother runs... I knew them personally. They were so interesting and full of life and dynamic, and had so much to tell,” he said.

The discussion had three panelists including Brazilian producer Ana Stella de Almeida Quesado and Mandla Dube, director from South Africa.

The festival will end on September 6 with the screening of Jackie Chan’s Skiptrace.