I try my best not to be like Akshay: Umesh Kamat | regional movies | Hindustan Times
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I try my best not to be like Akshay: Umesh Kamat

Even as Umesh Kamat’s Marathi play Don’t Worry Be Happy completes 200 shows, the actor tries to play down the similarities to his character, Akshay

regional movies Updated: Jul 03, 2017 18:22 IST
Anjali Shetty
Umesh Kamat tries his best not be like his onstage character Akshay.
Umesh Kamat tries his best not be like his onstage character Akshay.(HTPHOTO)

Umesh Kamat’s play Don’t Worry Be Happy has completed 200 successful runs across the state. The artiste is pleased with the response and hopes that the show crosses many more milestones. “The plot of the play is very relevant. Five out of the 10 couples, who come to watch the film, tell me that this is exactly their story. They relate to each line in the play, which is about a distraught couple stuck in the rut of career, family planning and society,” says Umesh, who admits to have traits of Akshay (his character) off the stage too.

“I am trying my best not to become like him. However, when my wife Priya (Bapat, actor) saw the play, she kept reciting the same dialogues to me. Like Akshay, even I have the habit of leaving my car keys in the pant pocket, which is then found in the washing machine,” he says.

A year ago, Umesh decided to be picky about films and rejected over six films. “I did not want to do the same type of films again. I rejected some because of the script, some because of the budget and some because the producer wanted to wrap the film in 15 days,” says the Mumbai Time (2016) actor.

He adds that despite being a content-driven industry, the lack of presentation and marketing budget have held back some great films. “We have producers who say, ‘I have `1.5crore, now make a film’. They act like they are bargaining at a local market. This needs to stop. I am not saying good films are not made with low budgets. However, allocation of budgets to the right departments is necessary,” he says.

Even though he “may be frowned upon”, Umesh talks frankly about the amateur producers in the industry. He says, “I feel new producers should spend ample time on the sets with directors and other members. They should get a hands-on experience of the situation and understand the nuances of film-making. This will help them plan a film better. Awareness among presenters and producers is a must.”