Renowned international editor to cut Baahubali for the world | regional movies | Hindustan Times
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Renowned international editor to cut Baahubali for the world

It is not yet clear how long the international version will be. And mind you, there is the second part of Baahubali coming in about a year's time.

regional movies Updated: Jul 19, 2015 13:44 IST
Gautaman Bhaskaran
Gautaman Bhaskaran
Hindustan Times
baahubali

Bahubali

Renowned international editor, Vincent Tabaillon, will cut the Telugu version of Rajamouli's Baahubali for world audiences.

The edition, culled out from the 160-minute Baahubali, will be out by the end of August, according to sources close to the production companies. It is not yet clear how long the international version will be. And mind you, there is the second part of Baahubali coming in about a year's time.

Tabaillon, a French national, has to his editing credit movies of epic dimensions -- like The Incredible Hulk and Clash of the Titans. While The Incredible Hulk talks talks about a scientist who turns into a monster every time he loses his temper and how he finally has to grapple not with himself but a soldier who is far stronger, Clash of Titans is the story of Perseus who battles minions of the underworld to stop them from conquering heaven and earth. Both are heroic works, larger-than-life -- quite similar to Baahubali. Remember that awesome scene of the hero lifting and carrying the humungous Shivaligam up the mountain!

It is clear that from these couple of credits that Tabaillon's interest is to tame mighty films into ones that will not let you fidget in your cinema seat. Alfred Hitchcock one famously quipped that the length of a movie must be as long as one can hold one's bladder. So, many of the foreign films usually stick to under 100 minutes.

Hence, some sources feel that a shorter version of Baahubali will appeal better to foreign audiences. Irrfan Khan once told this writer that Indian pictures make one "yawn" with their length and unnecessary footage. This is one reason why Indian works are not popular with foreigners, used to crisply edited fare. Buddhadeb Dasgupta has always felt that movies should be under 120 minutes to retain viewer attention. So too, Adoor Gopalakrishnan, who has been critical of the length -- even of those works made by arthouse directors in India.

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