Facebook makes kids more likely to dislike their looks, argue with parents | sex and relationships | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 30, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Facebook makes kids more likely to dislike their looks, argue with parents

Heavy users of social networking sites such as Facebook are more likely to be unhappy with their own appearances and to argue with their parents than non-users, a new UK study has found.

sex and relationships Updated: Sep 13, 2016 11:11 IST
PTI
Facebook

Researchers also found that girls are twice as likely as boys to be online for long periods and heavy social media users are more likely to argue with their parents. (Shutterstock)

Heavy users of social networking sites such as Facebook are more likely to be unhappy with their own appearances and to argue with their parents than non-users, a new UK study has found.

The study by Essex University in the UK, involving 3,500 children aged ten to 15, found that of those who used social media for more than three hours a night, only 53 per cent were content with their appearance, compared with 82 per cent of non-users.

Researchers also found that girls are twice as likely as boys to be online for long periods and heavy social media users are more likely to argue with their parents.

Children who defined themselves as heavy social media users were more dissatisfied with relationships. (Shutterstock)

The UK government-backed survey also that found that 17 per cent of heavy social media users are bullied a lot as compared with 11 per cent of light users.

It found that truancy rates or absenteeism was much higher for heavy users - 14 per cent compared to six per cent.

Heavy users were also twice as likely to say that they misbehaved in class, The Sun reported.

Children who defined themselves as heavy social media users were more dissatisfied with relationships.

They were less happy with friends and family, with five per cent saying they did not feel supported by relatives as compared with just one per cent of youngsters who were seldom on social media sites.

Follow @htlifeandstyle for more