Is love bleeding us ‘dry’ on Valentine’s Day? | sex and relationships | Hindustan Times
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Is love bleeding us ‘dry’ on Valentine’s Day?

If you’re one of those people that believe that Valentine’s Day is an expensive affair, there are now big, scary numbers to back you up.

valentines day 2016 Updated: Feb 14, 2016 07:25 IST
Richa
A single rose flower, for instance, requires approximately 10 litres of water to cultivate and transport to your friendly neighbourhood florist.
A single rose flower, for instance, requires approximately 10 litres of water to cultivate and transport to your friendly neighbourhood florist.(AFP)

If you’re one of those people that believe that Valentine’s Day is an expensive affair, there are now big, scary numbers to back you up.

The dates, the trips (this is a weekend, after all), the presents and the drinks aren’t, by any standard, easy on your wallet – or the planet. A single rose flower, for instance, requires approximately 10 litres of water to cultivate and transport to your friendly neighbourhood florist; every pint of beer has at least 280 litres of water behind it while the production of a large bar of chocolate needs more than 3,400 litres!

According to the World Health Organisation, ‘a minimum of 7.5 litres per capita per day will meet the requirements for most people under most conditions’.

Adding the water footprint of the three aforementioned items shows us that this amount could have been used to provide 492 people with water for a whole day.

This is especially significant in the light of the fact that at least 783 million -- or one out of every 10 -- people do not have access to clean drinking water. Further, nearly a million people die from water, sanitation and hygiene-related diseases every year.

So if you’re planning the day ahead, use the graphic below to get an idea of what your Valentine celebrations might, very literally, cost you.