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Recession distancing lovers

Do you find your partner showing up long after you’ve turned the lights off? Well, blame it on recession that is metaphorically become the woh in your relationship. Chetna Joshi Bambroo discovers.

sex and relationships Updated: May 27, 2009 12:54 IST
Chetna Joshi Bambroo

When was the last time you reached home early to take your family out for a surprise dinner or a late night movie? Do you find your partner showing up long after you’ve turned the lights off? Well, blame it on recession that is metaphorically become the woh in your relationship.

A flustered Shelja Kumar, 28, says, “My hubby works in the banking sector and I see him only for a couple of hours a day. His work doesn’t seem to end.”

Her husband has told her that because of recession he has to put in extra hours to prove that he is indispensable. And does she believe him? “I sometimes doubt him but I try not to have negative thoughts,” she says.

If you thought women have always been at the receiving end, Vineet Arya proves otherwise. Vineet works in the government sector and his girlfriend is with an ad agency.

“I am off on the weekends and if you ask me, I truly despise it. My girlfriend’s work hours are very erratic and we hardly get to spend time together,” he cribs. Doesn’t he complain? “What can I say?” rues Vineet, especially in such times when the pink slip is flying, thick and fast.

Two-gether
Unlike Vineet, Abhijeet and Sneha, IT professionals, make time for each other. “We reach home at more or less the same time,” says Sneha. She cites recession as an ostensible reason given by many to do other “objectionable” things. “The situation is bad but that doesn’t mean one has to work extra hours. I think people, on the pretext of recession, are fooling their partners and doing things that otherwise their partner would have objected to,” she says.

Slowdown tricks
For some, the slowdown works as a sympathy tool. Pratik Sharma, who earlier couldn’t have drinks at home, is now allowed to gulp down a peg or two. “Earlier, my wife used to throw a fit, if I used to drink more than twice a month. But now, when I make a grim face explaining how bad things are at work, she allows me a drink,” grins Pratik.

Abhijeet sums it up: “If companies are making the most of it (recession) by saving money, what’s the harm if the ‘victims’, have some innocent fun too?”