Women more sensitive to annoying behaviour than men: True that | sex and relationships | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 26, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Women more sensitive to annoying behaviour than men: True that

The research led by a Michigan State University psychology professor suggests women are more likely than men to get irked at irritating or boorish behaviour exhibited by acquaintances, friends or partners.

sex and relationships Updated: Feb 03, 2016 18:11 IST
The research led by a Michigan State University psychology professor suggests women are more likely than men to get irked at irritating or boorish behaviour exhibited by acquaintances, friends or partners.
The research led by a Michigan State University psychology professor suggests women are more likely than men to get irked at irritating or boorish behaviour exhibited by acquaintances, friends or partners.(Tumblr)

Women may be friendlier than men, but when it comes to irksome behaviour, females are the ones more sensitive towards it than their male counterparts, according to a recent study.

The research led by a Michigan State University psychology professor suggests women are more likely than men to get irked at irritating or boorish behaviour exhibited by acquaintances, friends or partners.

Read: 6 super annoying things girlfriends say, but shouldn’t

Researcher Christopher J Hopwood said that women generally are more sensitive to other people’s annoying behaviour than men, adding that they’re maybe more socially aware, on average, and so perhaps it’s easier for them to pick out things that are annoying than men are.

The study, based on a survey of 235 people, set out to evaluate whether women and men differ in their sensitivities to the aversive behaviour of the people with whom they interact.

Read: 6 most annoying people you meet online

The study examined a number of aversive behaviours such as being antagonistic, controlling and overly or inappropriately affectionate.

The findings are compelling, the study notes, because of the cultural implications they have for understanding detrimental behaviour that could lead to relationship problems.

The findings appear in the journal Personality and Individual Differences.

Follow @htlifeandstyle for more.