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HindustanTimes Sun,21 Sep 2014

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India matchless in chequered game

It's a sport in which India is a powerhouse even on the world stage. Indeed, on the Asian stage in Doha, the Indians were quite unstoppable.

Salute cricket's Bannister

Jayasuriya has not just been productive, he has also been good to watch. He is not jumpy at the crease, writes Akshay Sawai.

Cricket, my Cup of woes spills over

I decide to flee Delhi, in an attempt to flee the World Cup. But I make a mistake, writes Poonam Saxena.

And finally, out of Africa

The team left the ground, cheered by fans and received a warm reception at the hotel, writes Amrit Mathur.

Smells like team spirit

India have many individual stalwarts, they need to pull together as a team to pull it off, writes John Wright.

Bidding a final farewell

The flight back to Bombay was packed and Sachin’s misery began even before the seat-belt signs were switched on, writes Amrit Mathur.

Three quick men and the quest for semis spot

If the Lankans have the best bowling side, then the Kiwis should surely be counted as the second best, writes Javagal Srinath.

In cricket, captain before the coach

Imran Khan says it is harsh to blame Chappell for India's exit from the World Cup.

Jumbo take-off is totally unmatched

India may have lost in the WC, but the biggest loss is the retirement of Anil Kumble from the one-dayers, writes Sunil Gavaskar.

Tendulkar continues to be a class apart

The disappointment of not being in the WC subsides,  but Sachin is still one of the class acts, writes Glenn Mcgrath.

Players get stick, Greg the carrot

The BCCI has acted clever, playing a neat flick to deflect criticism towards the players, writes Amrit Mathur.

Variety always adds spice to the world

 A great bowling side is never complete without a good captain marshalling his resources well, writes Javagal Srinath.

Meanwhile, at the World Cup...

The thrill of not knowing how deep the Aussie batting side remains the high point for me this World Cup, writes Indrajit Hazra.

How Australia ‘reversed’ their fortunes

Tait's ball swings only in the last few feet before landing. It can be lethal, writes Aakash Chopra.
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