Airbrushed, Demi Moore is unrecognisable

  • Demi Moore

    Morphing Demi Moore beyond recognition, reopens the au naturel vs artificial debate. Click on for heavily airbrushed Moore in cosmetics giant Helena Rubenstein's new ad ...

  • Demi Moore

    Demi Moore, who was spotted looking scary and uncomfortably thin post spilt with Ashton Kutcher, looks ravishing in cosmetics giant Helena Rubenstein's new ad campaign. ...

  • Julia Roberts

    In L'Oreal's ad, Julia Roberts, the brunette beauty has been tranformed into a young blonde - courtesy the photoshop wand.

  • Aishwarya Rai

    Aishwarya Rai's skin was 'whitened' in the December 2010 issue of Elle magazine.

  • Madonna

    In Dolce & Gabbana's ad, Madonna has been tranformed into young diva - courtesy the photoshop wand.

  • Britney Spears's

    Britney Spears's body has been trimmed down, her cellulite erased and even the tattoo on her back has been removed with airbrushing.

  • Beyonce

    A little retouching and a digital tummy tuck make the naturally beautiful Beyonce look like a painting.

  • Cameron Diaz's

    Cameron Diaz's prominent hipbones are gone and she looks way fairer after digital altering.

  • Gwen

    No Doubt singer Gwen Stefani looks radiant and younger with some airbrushing.

  • Madonna

    Age-defying looks of pop queen Madonna are all thanks to photoshop magic which has hidden her wrinkles, eye-bags, and dull skin tone.

Demi Moore, who was spotted looking scary and uncomfortably thin post spilt with Ashton Kutcher, looks ravishing in cosmetics giant Helena Rubenstein's new ad campaign. She looks heavily airbrushed and has shaken off her anorexic look, at least in the photoshoot.

The 49-year-old star, who was recently treated in a rehab for eating disorder and addiction issues, is the face of Helena Rubenstein.

The difference is so drastic that Moore looks unidentifiable in the picture with flawless skin and perfect sharp features. The picture is shot in a way that it gives the effect of a V-shaped jawline (while actually it's U-shaped).

In 2009, she was caught in a similar controversy. She was accused of airbrushing a chunk of her hip on a photograph used on the cover of W Magazine. The shot of the image was such that it actually created an illusion of her left hip being erased. However, she rubbished the reports saying she doesn't have any hips anyway.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/3/demimoore-airbrushed.jpg

This whole controversy isn't new, but time and time again reminds us of the shrinking acceptance of reality. There's a counterpoint here though. Often all of us get albums - in images and videos - done of our private celebrations where we look, if not entirely, quite different from our everyday selves. We happily slap on tonnes of makeup and get airbrushed. The digital technology turns a Plain Jane into a hottie in no time. Our skin looks blemish free but we continue to look our age, okay may be a tad younger. But when celebs get airbrushed they raise the bar to an unachievable degree.

Here's a look at some of the other 'famous' veneers from our time and day:

Aishwarya Rai for Elle magazine
For its 14th Anniversary issue in December 2010 the Indian edition of Elle magazine signed up the "most beautiful woman in the world." But a race row ensued when fans and followers saw a rather white Aishwarya Rai on the cover of the magazine.

"Readers reacted with fury after it was ­suggested that the fashion magazine might have digitally 'bleached' the complexion," Daily Mail reported.

There were reports that Aishwarya was miffed after reading these reports and informal sources had suggested that there could've been legal action against the magazine. We never heard anything of the kind later though.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/3/aishwarya-airbrushed.jpg

Julia Roberts for L'Oreal
Two adverts by French cosmetics giant L'Oreal over "misleading" airbrushed images of actress Julia Roberts and supermodel Christy Turlington were banned by the Britain's advertising watchdog - Advertising Standards Authority. AFP reported that L'Oreal, the world's largest cosmetics maker, had failed to prove that the photos used in its magazine adverts accurately showed the results of the products.

The ban followed a complaint by a British lawmaker about ads for L'Oreal's Teint Miracle foundation, promoted by Roberts for the Lancome brand, and ads for The Eraser foundation by Maybelline, featuring Turlington.

After some back and forth on the issue, Advertising Standards Authority made their decision. Matt Wilson, ASA spokesman said: "We accept that digital manipulation is used in adverts but it has to be done in a truthful way."

This happened in July 2011.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/3/julia-roberts-airbrushed.jpg

Madonna for Dolce & Gabbana
Captured by celebrity photographer Steven Klein on November 6th, 2010 in New York City, Madge looks half her age in this ad campaign.

"The ad campaign, which is inspired by Italian Neorealism cinema, shows a very domesticated Madonna washing dishes and preparing food at a dining room table," Just Jared had reported.

Compliments were paid, but then incriminating evidence surfaced online. Jezebel noted: "It certainly looks as if the photographs taken were retouched extensively; in the ad, her nose is slimmer, her jaw is not as wide, her neck is smooth, the definition in her arms has been smoothed away, and any visible veins in her hands or arms have been removed. A woman should not actually appear to have blood pumping in her body!" 

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/3/madonna-airbrushed.jpg

Kim Kardashian
Not even a formidable Kim Kardashian could avert the ruthless digital morphing routine. She too must undergo the scanner and become fair and more desirable. See this image, it makes the bootylicious woman looking thinner around her thighs and fairer all over.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2012/3/kim-kardashian-airbrushed.jpg

 

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