From IIT stable this time: ‘Formula 1’ car | tech reviews | Hindustan Times
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From IIT stable this time: ‘Formula 1’ car

The IITians have built their very own F1, which is set to hit the roads in 20 days from now, Jaya Shroff reports.

tech reviews Updated: Apr 20, 2007 03:44 IST

The IIT research fair I2tech is in town again with lots of fun and innovation from the science geniuses. Believe it or not these young scientists from the IIT have built their very own Formula1, which is expected to hit the roads in 20 days from now.

“From conceptualising, designing, to manufacturing, we have done it all on our own,” said an enthusiastic Tushar Garg. “We have nicknamed the project, ‘Formula SAE.’ The team AXLR8R, intends to represent India internationally and compete with universities worldwide in the most prestigious Formula SAE International Competition in California, US in June 2007.

Pointing to a nut and bolt loosely tied up, Dr. Sudipto Mukherjee said, “This is what we are here for, to show them the way.” The project advisor credited his “usually smart” batch of students for the exceptional perseverance and patience they have shown in conceiving and formulating the project. Showing the percolated brake pedal Garg said, “Weightlessness is very essential to the very nature of the car,” he further said, “Every gram counts.”

The car has a 600 cc Yamaha R6 motorcycle engine and most parts are made with the locally available material. For the 11 students nurturing the car, the experience is far more than a project. “Students were ready to take the risk, for when we started it was just a dream,” said Nikhil Gupta, Project Coordinator. Looking at the unfinished car, with the engine neatly fixed and steering almost in place, “The finished car will be red and black in color. It will have a lot of glamour and sheen,” he added.

Smart cane: Another project with a definite vision in the long list of exhibits will be the “Smart Cane.” The cane designed for the visually challenged has been designed with a lot of sensibility and sensitivity. “It is not just another project, we can see target audience and we have grown to be aware of their needs,” said Rohan Paul. The cane will have the necessary tools so as to make the visually impaired completely free of dependence. “We had several challenges, cost effectiveness was a criteria and then understanding the needs of the blind was equally imperative,” said Paul. Though the cost of the cane is still to be worked out once it gets the final approval from National Association for the Blind, the team of six young IITians was sure that it was be far cheaper than the American versions, which easily cost about a thousand dollars.