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Competitors yet friends

tv Updated: Dec 23, 2010 15:54 IST
Rachana Dubey
Rachana Dubey
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

This Saturday, singers Abhilasha Chellum, Khurram and Bishakh Jyoti Mazumdar will compete with each other in the concluding episode of Zee TV’s Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Singing Superstar. The climax will be aired live and the winner decided on public votes.

Eastern edge
Given that in most finales the eastern states of India vote the most, does Bishakh think he has an edge over his other competitors? “No,” he laughs. “I’m as talented as Khurram and Abhilasha. They find me really dramatic but honestly, I adore them as friends and singers. So I would pray that they get as many votes as they deserve and I get what I deserve. I can’t consider myself a winner because East Indian states vote extensively. They don’t necessarily vote for a Bengali guy. They could vote for others too. I won the Bengali Sa Re Ga Ma Pa but that doesn’t mean I’ll win this title too,” he says.

Confidence booster
Chellum had previously participated in the Marathi Sa Re Ga Ma Pa contest and made it to the finals. “It doesn’t give me an edge but it definitely boosts my confidence because if I could sing in an alien language and still reach the finals, I can certainly do well in a Hindi competition. I don’t know if I’ll win but I’ll give it my best shot,” she adds.

This time around, musicians AR Rahman and Ustaad Ghulam Ali will be present at the finale too. Given that the contestants have performed before Rahman in the past, do they plan another special performance this time? “I will definitely impress him with my performance,” says Bishakh. Chellum is keeping her fingers crossed to land a chance to work with the Oscar winner.

Big plans
Meanwhile, the contestants say that there is no anxiety or competitiveness between them. Each has a plan B – Chellum wants to educate herself in music and use it to teach younger kids and devise a way of treating illness with music. The boys plan to become composers, cut albums and shift base to Mumbai.

“Our mentors have opened doors for us. They’ve made us sing for their upcoming projects; introduced us to other composers and shown us hope,” says Khurram. “I’m sure this show isn’t the end; it is a beginning for all of us.”