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Managing the TV star

When you think of film stars, you think of the large entourage accompanying them. But TV actors aren’t too far behind. They too have a barrage of helpers in various capacities. The big names on the small screen have super busy lives.

tv Updated: Feb 25, 2013 16:45 IST
Kavita awaasthi
Ram-Kapoor-suppressing-a-chuckle
Ram-Kapoor-suppressing-a-chuckle

When you think of film stars, you think of the large entourage accompanying them. But TV actors aren’t too far behind. They too have a barrage of helpers in various capacities. The big names on the small screen have super busy lives, and to help them through their day, week and year, they need everyone, from managers, assistants, publicists and lawyers to hair and make-up persons and spot boys.

Several young, flavour-of-the-year actors earn a hefty R2-3 lakh for a day’s work when it comes to brand endorsements, appearances and other such commitments. For their shows, they get barely a quarter of that amount. Established actors easily earn R5-8 lakh for ads. Popular faces on TV take home R3-4 lakh for appearances or just cutting ribbons.

This makes their managers very important people. Since the star is busy making appearances at events, shooting for print and TV ads, film roles and their biggest moolah earner — stage shows — the manager is hired. He or she looks after the actor’s shooting schedules, juggles their various commitments and makes sure that producers are happy with the star’s work. Of course. actors get flooded with assignments only if their show and character are very popular.


Many like Manish Paul and Ram Kapoor have managers who not only handle dates, but also negotiate their remuneration. Usually, actors bag assignments through personal and professional contacts, so it can be tricky to discuss money or turn down offers from someone they share a good
rapport with. This is where the middleman — the manager — steps in.


Now, there are two kinds of managers. The first actively seeks out the best work for his client, works on a commission basis and earns a percentage (usually five to 15 per cent) of what the star earns. The other kind is hired to handle the date diary, negotiate fee and ensure that the actor sticks to their schedule. Of late, big celebrity management companies have entered the fray. They charge a standard fee and the star too prefers to have one point of contact for all things work-related.