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Soon, India's first 3D animation soap

Come October and a new channel Me Home, will come up with the first-ever 3D daily soap on television. The channel also offers an array of fictional shows like...

tv Updated: Sep 25, 2010 14:12 IST
Rachana Dubey

Me Home, helmed by Manas Group of Companies, Faridabad, the 12th contender in the Hindi General Entertainment space currently dominated by Colors, Star Plus and Zee TV, will be launched on October 8. However, commercial programming will commence only from October 18.



The channel based out of Delhi NCR, goes on air with 10 hours of programming, with dailies running four days a week. Friday, Saturday and Sunday will be reserved for ‘different’ content. Me Home flags off with 36 shows, including two reality shows and India’s first 3D animation daily fantasy soap.



The fiction line-up includes Vimal Kumar’s

Dooriyan Nazdikiyan

, Smita Thackeray’s

Tere Bina

and

Metri

, Dushyant Chauhan’s

Armaan

and reality show

Generation Next

, Milind Soman’s

Abhinetri

and

Ek Aur Love Story

, Abaan Deohans’

Ek Adhura Milind SomanKhwaab

and

Bhoomika

, Maan Singh Deep’s

Vansh

, Ashley Rebello’s

Look

, Venus Records’

Hum Intezaar Karenge

and

Naina

,

Parchaiyyan

and

Pal Do Pal Ka Saath

by other smaller producers.



CEO Peeyush Sapru says, “We have at least 16 episodes of most of our shows in the cans before the channel goes on air.”



He is particularly proud of the 3D daily soap,

Love, Masti, Magic

. “It’s one of our channel’s USPs because no other channel has a show like this.”



Reportedly, the channel was denied an up-linking license by the Information & Broadcasting Ministry, pushing the launch ahead by a few months. It’s learnt that it only sailed through because ex-Samajwadi leader Amar Singh and INLD’s leader Om Prakash Chautala have invested in it.



“I can prove that these rumours are false,” insists Sapru. “We don’t need any politician’s money to run our station. It’s true that we don’t have an up-linking license, but we’ve tied up with another company as content providers, which takes care of everything.”