At least 10 in minibus killed by roadside bomb in northwest Pakistan | world-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 13, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

At least 10 in minibus killed by roadside bomb in northwest Pakistan

A remote-controlled roadside bomb targeting a minibus killed at least 10 people and wounded several others in Pakistan’s northwestern tribal region bordering Afghanistan on Tuesday

world Updated: Apr 25, 2017 21:05 IST
A remote-controlled roadside bomb targeting a minibus killed at least 10 people and wounded several others in Pakistan’s northwestern tribal region bordering Afghanistan on Tuesday.
A remote-controlled roadside bomb targeting a minibus killed at least 10 people and wounded several others in Pakistan’s northwestern tribal region bordering Afghanistan on Tuesday.(REUTERS File Photo)

A remote-controlled roadside bomb targeting a minibus killed at least 10 people and wounded several others in Pakistan’s northwestern tribal region bordering Afghanistan on Tuesday, an official in the region said.

“Ten people were killed, including a woman and one child,” Shahid Ali Khan, assistant political agent for Kurram Agency in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), told Reuters.

Khan said the militants planted a roadside bomb in Kurram Agency, close to the Afghanistan border. “When the passengers were coming, they detonated the remote-controlled bomb,” he said.

No group immediately claimed responsibility for the bomb.

The Kurram tribal district is known for sectarian clashes between Sunnis and Shiites, who make up roughly 20 percent of Pakistan’s population of 200 million, and it has also been a stronghold for the Pakistani Taliban as well as its factions.

Parachinar, the district capital, was the location of the first major militant attack in Pakistan in 2017, a marketplace bomb which killed 24 people in January and was claimed by the Pakistani Taliban.

The same group claimed a car bomb attack in the district in March that killed at least 22 people.

The area also continues to suffer from a high casualty rate linked to landmines placed by Soviet forces in Pakistani border towns during their war in Afghanistan that began in 1979 and ended ten years later.

The Soviets planted the bombs as a means of intimidating local populations to prevent them joining an anti-communist uprising across the border.