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In pics | Subway Therapy: How New Yorkers vent on post-it notes after elections

New York commuters are venting anger and frustration over Republican Donald Trump's shock victory by indulging in collective therapy -- writing messages on post-it notes and sticking them on a subway wall.

world Updated: Nov 13, 2016 09:48 IST
AP
Subway riders write post-it notes on the walls of a subway tunnel in New York City on November 10. New York commuters are venting anger and frustration over Republican Donald Trump's shock victory by indulging in collective therapy -- writing messages on post-it notes and sticking them on a subway wall.
Subway riders write post-it notes on the walls of a subway tunnel in New York City on November 10. New York commuters are venting anger and frustration over Republican Donald Trump's shock victory by indulging in collective therapy -- writing messages on post-it notes and sticking them on a subway wall.(AFP)

New Yorkers struggling with post-election stress have found an outlet for the blues — by pouring their political souls onto sticky notes that fill walls of a Manhattan subway station.

In the days after Republican Donald Trump won the White House, Democrat Hillary Clinton’s loss brought many of her New York supporters to tears — even in public.

Enter 28-year-old Brooklyn artist Matthew Chavez, known as Levee. He set up a table in a long tunnel of the Union Square station where he hands out the blank pastel notes on which straphangers scribble.

He calls this “Subway Therapy.” It’s free.

More than 1,500 people have shared their grief and anxiety since Wednesday, posting thoughts on the white subway tiles, according to Subway Therapy’s Instagram.

Matthew Chavez, who goes by the artist name Levee, talks to children about the messages posted on the "Subway Therapy" wall. (AP)

One reads, “You will not divide us. Love is everything.” Another says, “It doesn’t end today.”

One says “If they go low, we go high,” echoing first lady Michelle Obama.

The uplifting art installation counterbalances what Clinton supporters say is Trump’s racism, bigotry and ignorance.

A commuter places a Post-it note on the "Subway Therapy" wall in New York. (AP)

Another sticky note offers soothing words, saying, “Everything will be alright.” But a few feet over, another person wasn’t so sure: “What do we do now?”

There lies an answer within this "Subway Therapy" . (AP)

There was an answer amid the sea of impromptu messages.

“We’ve been through worse (meaning 9/11) and the city will unite,” the light pink sticky note said. “We will get through this together because love trumps hate.”