India, Canada close to completing long-pending foreign investment agreement | world-news | Hindustan Times
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India, Canada close to completing long-pending foreign investment agreement

Canadian minister of international trade François-Philippe Champagne said both New Delhi and Ottawa want to ensure that the agreement is concluded and brought into force as quickly as possible.

world Updated: Jun 10, 2017 20:30 IST
Anirudh Bhattacharyya
Canada’s minister of international trade François-Philippe Champagne (center) with Canadian high commissioner to New Delhi Nadir Patel (left) and Indian high commissioner to Ottawa Vikas Swarup at the Canada India Business Symposium.
Canada’s minister of international trade François-Philippe Champagne (center) with Canadian high commissioner to New Delhi Nadir Patel (left) and Indian high commissioner to Ottawa Vikas Swarup at the Canada India Business Symposium.(Bashir Nasir/ICCC)

India and Canada are “close” to concluding the long-pending bilateral Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement (FIPPA), according to Canadian minister of international trade François-Philippe Champagne.

Champagne was speaking at the Canada India Business Symposium, organised by the Indo-Canada Chamber of Commerce and Indo-Canadian Business Chamber in Toronto.

The minister indicated further progress on a date to complete the process was made as he met finance minister Arun Jaitley on the margins of the OECD Ministerial Council Meeting in Paris earlier this month. Champagne had also visited India in March this year.

He said that both sides wanted to ensure FIPPA “is concluded and brought into force as quickly as possible, as we have made good progress on that front”. While pointing to increased growth in two-way trade between the countries, he said, “It’s just the tip of the iceberg of what’s possible.”

Speaking at the same event, Indian high commissioner Vikas Swarup said, “Canada cannot find a better partner than India.”

As Canada struggles in dealing with the Donald Trump administration south of its border, Swarup pointedly noted that India has a market of 750 million people, more than double the United States’ population: “You need a market which can compete with the US market, because that’s the market Canada is obsessed with,” he said.

The symposium also featured around 150 Indian companies, and their presence was facilitated by the Canadian high commission in New Delhi as Ottawa’s envoy Nadir Patel wanted to mark 150 years of his country’s confederation by bringing a symbolic number of business delegates to Toronto to confer with Canadian industry, associations and decision-makers.