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HindustanTimes Thu,28 Aug 2014

World

India's technical education 'too effective' 'to be envied': Clinton
PTI
Washington, August 19, 2009
First Published: 08:42 IST(19/8/2009)
Last Updated: 14:48 IST(19/8/2009)

Lauding India's technical education system, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton believes the country is one of the best in this field, though it faces a challenge of providing adequate primary education to millions of children.

"You can look at the very best in Indian education, and it's the best in the world. You can look at the technical education and it is to be envied. It is so effective," Clinton said in response to a question which was texted to her during her recent trip to India.

Answers by the top US diplomat to select questions have now been posted on the State Department's website.

Clinton said millions of children in India, however, don't have adequate primary education or secondary education or, certainly, college education.

"India faces the challenge of so many people to serve in very rural areas, often without adequate infrastructure, so you have to come to grips with how you actually produce the schools that are needed, the teachers who will be dedicated, the curriculum and materials that are required," she said.

"It is truly up to all of us -- families, governments, businesses, educational institutions -- to do everything we can to give every child a chance to grow up and fulfill his or her God-given potential," Clinton said.

Referring to her trip to Mumbai last month where she discussed education with volunteers from Teach India and Teach for India, Clinton said their passion for service lit up their faces as they talked about the importance of giving every Indian child the chance for an excellent education.

"The underpinning of global progress is education across the entire spectrum, from early schooling to the advanced research and post-graduate work," she said.

The question was asked by Ashish from Massachusetts who on a recent trip to Mumbai, had the opportunity to talk to many young migrant workers who arrive in the country's financial capital from remote villages every week, in a bid to earn their livelihood.

"In this process, they are permanently starved from an education, which could perhaps give them a better future some day. Do you feel that under the new administration, the United States would take a consistently active interest in monitoring and assisting the educational challenges of many children and young adults in developing countries?" Ashish had asked.


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