Iran is a ‘powerful country’ US cannot harm, says former Iranian President Ahmadinejad | world-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 27, 2017-Thursday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Iran is a ‘powerful country’ US cannot harm, says former Iranian President Ahmadinejad

Former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Saturday he does not view recent US missile strikes on ally Syria as a message for Iran, which he called a “powerful country” that the US cannot harm.

world Updated: Apr 16, 2017 00:24 IST
Former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad gives an interview to The Associated Press at his office, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, April 15, 2017. Ahmadinejad says he does not view recent U.S. missile strikes on ally Syria as a message for Iran, which he called a
Former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad gives an interview to The Associated Press at his office, in Tehran, Iran, Saturday, April 15, 2017. Ahmadinejad says he does not view recent U.S. missile strikes on ally Syria as a message for Iran, which he called a "powerful country" that the U.S. cannot harm.(AP Photo)

Former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Saturday he does not view recent US missile strikes on ally Syria as a message for Iran, which he called a “powerful country” that the US cannot harm.

The controversial former president made the remarks to The Associated Press on Saturday, three days after he stunned Iranians by registering to run for president again.

His surprise candidacy must still be approved by authorities but has already upended a race that was widely expected to be won by incumbent moderate Hassan Rouhani.

US President Donald Trump’s administration earlier this year announced it was putting Iran “on notice” in part over its ballistic missile tests, and last week pounded a Syrian air base with cruise missiles in response to a chemical weapons attack.

Iran is the main regional backer of Syrian President Bashar Assad and is involved militarily on the ground in that country’s civil war.

Ahmadinejad dismissed suggestions that the U.S. strike on Syria might also be a warning for his country.

“I do not think it has a message for Iran. Iran is a powerful country and people like Mr. Trump or the United States administration cannot hurt Iran,” he said.

Ahmadinejad also voiced reluctant support for Iran’s 2015 nuclear deal with the U.S. and other world powers, which saw Iran accept curbs on its nuclear program in exchange for relief from crippling international sanctions.

Iran has managed to sign a series of multibillion-dollar civilian aircraft deals since sanctions were lifted, but many ordinary Iranians are still waiting on hoped-for economic benefits of the nuclear agreement to trickle down.

“The nuclear deal is a legal document and a pact. In the Islamic Republic, the officials and the supreme leader have approved of it and declared their commitment to it,” Ahmadinejad said.

“The problem about the nuclear deal is how they advertised it. Both parties have represented it in such a way as if it can solve all the issues of human history. It was incorrect. It later turned out to be untrue,” he continued.

Ahmadinejad’s candidacy has left many inside Iran scratching their heads.

He registered to run on the same day as did his former Vice President Hamid Baghaei, saying at the time his decision was meant to support his political ally.

His candidacy runs in opposition to a recommendation Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei that he not run because it would create a “polarized situation” that would be “harmful for the county.”

Ahmadinejad had ruled out running in the wake of Khamenei’s comments in September, but after reversing course this week he called the supreme leader’s comments “just advice” that does not prevent him from running.