‘Republicans exploring how to replace Trump if he drops out’ | world-news | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 23, 2017-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

‘Republicans exploring how to replace Trump if he drops out’

There are no signs Donald Trump will drop out of the race but Republicans are preparing themselves for it, just in case their nominee did, given how unpredictable he can be

world Updated: Aug 03, 2016 21:38 IST
HT Correspondent
Republican party officials “are so frustrated -- and confused by Donald Trump’s erratic behaviour -- that they are exploring how to replace him on the ballot if he were to drop out”.
Republican party officials “are so frustrated -- and confused by Donald Trump’s erratic behaviour -- that they are exploring how to replace him on the ballot if he were to drop out”.(Reuters)

There are no signs Donald Trump will drop out of the race but Republicans are preparing themselves for it, just in case their nominee did, given how unpredictable he can be.

ABC News reported on Wednesday Republican party officials “are so frustrated -- and confused by Donald Trump’s erratic behaviour -- that they are exploring how to replace him on the ballot if he were to drop out”.

They can’t force him out though, the network added.

Trump campaign advisers pushed back on the report, but the nominee himself, who is prolific on social media, has not responded to the report.

The report also said the party is furious with Trump’s refusal to endorse leading Republicans running for election.

Specifically Speaker Paul Ryan, the senior-most elected Republican in the country, and Senator John McCain, both of whom endorsed him despite initial reservations.

The nominee told The Washington Post in an interview on Tuesday he “was not there” yet on endorsing Ryan and McCain, using Speaker Ryan’s own words for him several weeks ago.

The Republican party is undergoing another churning over their nominee, who caused world-wide outrage recently by insulting parents of a fallen Muslim American soldier.

Some Republicans have gone over to his rival Hillary Clinton, such as Hewlett-Packard executive Meg Whitman, who once ran for California governor as a Republican.