Trump to federal judges: Even a ‘bad high school student’ would rule in my favour | world-news | Hindustan Times
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Trump to federal judges: Even a ‘bad high school student’ would rule in my favour

Contending that a US President has wide powers to control who comes into the country, Trump said that even a “bad high school student” would rule in his favour

world Updated: Feb 08, 2017 21:08 IST
IANS
Donald Trump
US President Donald Trump speaks to members of the law enforcement at the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) Winter Conference in Washington, U.S., February 8, 2017. (REUTERS Photo)

US President Donald Trump sought to lend his own legal argument for his executive order banning travel from certain Muslim-majority countries on Wednesday, discounting a legal challenge to the order as anti-security.

Contending that a US President has wide powers to control who comes into the country, Trump said that even a “bad high school student” would rule in his favour, CNN reported.

“This isn’t just me. This is for Obama, for Ronald Reagan, for the President. This was done, very importantly, for security,” Trump said.

“It was done for the security of our nation, for the security of our citizens, so people don’t come in who are going to do us harm. That is why is was done. It couldn’t have been written more precisely,” he said.

Trump said his executive order was “written beautifully” and fully within the bounds of US statute.

“We’re in an area that, let’s just say, they’re interpreting things differently than probably 100 per cent of people in this room,” Trump told a group of major city police officers and sheriffs in Washington.

“We want security,” Trump said.

On Tuesday evening, a federal appeals court heard arguments in the legal battle over the travel ban. The California-based Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals will decide soon whether to reinstate the executive order.

The top legal officials in 16 states, including Pennsylvania and Iowa which voted for Trump, filed a memorandum in support of efforts to halt the travel ban.

The state attorneys general from these states argued that they have standing as the executive order inflicts harm on states, including disruption at state universities and medical institutions.