Turkey’s Erdogan uses emergency decree to shut down schools, unions, charities

  • Reuters, Agency, Istanbul
  • Updated: Jul 23, 2016 21:39 IST
The streets of Turkey's major cities remain largely deserted on Friday, a day after Turkish lawmakers approved a three-month state of emergency that allows the government to extend detention times and issue decrees without parliamentary approval. (AP Photo)

President Tayyip Erdogan on Saturday tightened his grip on Turkey, ordering the closure of thousands of private schools, charities and other institutions in his first decree since imposing a state of emergency after the failed military coup last Friday.

In the decree, published by the Anadolu state news agency, Erdogan extended to 30 days from four the maximum period in which some suspects can be detained. It said this was to facilitate a full investigation into the coup attempt.

The first decree also authorises the closure of 1,043 private schools, 1,229 charities and foundations, 19 trade unions, 15 universities and 35 medical institutions over suspected links to the Gulen movement, the agency said.

Erdogan, who narrowly escaped capture and possible death during the July 15 coup attempt, told Reuters in an interview on Thursday he would restructure the armed forces and bring in “fresh blood”.

Read | As it happened: Turkey coup bid crumbles as crowds answer call to streets

Turkey’s Supreme Military Council (YAS) will meet under Erdogan’s supervision on July 28, a few days earlier than originally planned, private broadcaster NTV reported, a sign that the president wants to act fast to ensure the armed forces are fully under the government’s control.

Erdogan accused US-based Muslim preacher Fethullah Gulen , who has many followers in Turkey and abroad, of masterminding the failed coup, in which at least 246 people were killed. Gulen denies the charge and has condemned the coup.

Read | Turkish forces detain nephew of US-based preacher blamed for failed coup attempt

Purges in the system

The president declared the state of emergency late on Wednesday, a situation that allows the head of state and government to pass laws without first having to win parliamentary support and also allows them to curb or suspend rights and freedoms as they deem necessary.

Turkish authorities have already launched a series of mass purges of the armed forces, police, judiciary and education system, targeting followers of Gulen, who operates an extensive network of schools and charitable foundations.

Read | Turkey will lose the remnants of democracy to the military coup attempt

The Parliament must still approve the decree but requires only a simply majority, which the ruling AK Party founded by Erdogan and in power in Turkey since 2002 commands.

In an address to lawmakers late on Friday Erdogan vowed to bring to justice supporters of the Gulenist “terrorist” movement and he urged Turks to continue attending rallies in major cities in support of democracy and against the coup plotters.

Read | President Erdogan’s govt under fire: A history of coups in Turkey

Turkey expects to complete within a week to 10 days a dossier requesting Gulen’s extradition from the United States, Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu told private broadcaster NTV in an interview.

Cavusoglu said the link between soldiers involved in the abortive coup and Gulen’s extensive network of followers was “very clear”, adding that Turkey would do all it could “politically and legally” to secure his extradition.

Washington has said Ankara needs to provide clear evidence of Gulen’s involvement before it can agree to extradite him. Lawyers say the process could take many years.

On Friday evening Erdogan held his first meeting since the coup with the head of the national intelligence agency, Hakan Fidan, after complaining of significant intelligence shortcomings ahead of the coup attempt. Despite media speculation, however, he did not sack Fidan.

After the coup Western countries pledged support for democracy in Turkey, a NATO ally and an important partner in the fight against Islamic State, but they have also expressed concern over the scale of the subsequent purges of state institutions.

Turkish authorities have suspended, detained or placed under investigation more than 60,000 soldiers, police, judges, teachers, civil servants and others in the past week.

also read

The New York Times has compiled a list of all every insult Trump has made on Tw...
Show comments