UNHRC: Afghanistan sees state-sponsored terror from Pakistan | world-news | Hindustan Times
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UNHRC: Afghanistan sees state-sponsored terror from Pakistan

The Afghan representative said her country shared the sorrow and pain of the people of Pakistan over terror attacks, and added that Kabul remained committed to “state-to-state cooperation with Pakistan based on the principles of mutual respect and non-intervention”.

world Updated: Mar 24, 2017 21:39 IST
Prasun Sonwalkar
Trucks and other vehicles travel in the mountainous area near Torkham, close to the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. Pakistan on March 20 ordered the border with Afghanistan to be reopened
Trucks and other vehicles travel in the mountainous area near Torkham, close to the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. Pakistan on March 20 ordered the border with Afghanistan to be reopened "immediately", a month after it was closed amid soaring tensions as Islamabad and Kabul accused one another of providing safe haven for militants.(AFP)

In a rare outburst at the United Nations, Afghanistan on Thursday accused Pakistan of state-sponsored terrorism and told Islamabad that there cannot be a distinction between “good” and “bad” terrorists, surprising observers at the 34th session of the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.

Suraya Dalil, the Afghan representative, said “facts behind state-sponsored terrorism” can be substantiated by quoting on record former Pakistan president Pervez Musharraf, foreign policy adviser Sartaj Aziz and former ambassador to the US Hussain Haqqani.

Dalil’s charges, which she made after a report on Afghanistan was presented by deputy high commissioner of human rights Kate Gilmore, were rejected by the Pakistan representative. However, after two rounds of “right of reply”, she insisted that the “evidence presented… was made up of hard facts”.

Recalling a series of terrorist attacks in Afghanistan this year that left hundreds dead, she said: “Our investigations have declared that the attacks were organised, financed and sponsored outside our territory with composite methods and intricate intelligence.”

She said: “Afghanistan believes that there cannot be a distinction between good and bad terrorists. As long as a distinction between good and bad terrorism is maintained, we are all defeated.”

“The recent attacks on a hospital in Kabul as well as attacks in the shrine in Pakistan’s Sindh province serve as unmistakable proof that terror spares no boundaries and targets and that the deceptive classification of good and bad terrorists cost the lives of countless civilians in Pakistan.”

Afghanistan, Dalil said, shared the sorrow and pain of the people of Pakistan, and added that Kabul remained committed to “state-to-state cooperation with Pakistan based on the principles of mutual respect and non-intervention”.

Dalil and the Pakistan representative sparred in two rounds of “right to reply”, when the latter rejected the allegations, accusing Afghanistan of trying to “shroud its failures by shifting the blame to Pakistan”, and claiming that the people of Pakistan were “at risk from across the border”.

Dalil recalled that “Osama bin Laden had been tracked down in Pakistan a few years ago. “Mullah Mansour had been killed on Pakistani territory”, she said, adding, “The facts presented earlier were not rhetoric from Kabul but hard-core facts. From January until the present, the Pakistani military had violated the frontier several times.”