Virginia violence: Twitter names, shames white supremacists present at the rally | world-news | Hindustan Times
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Virginia violence: Twitter names, shames white supremacists present at the rally

People on the social website are sharing photos of white nationalists who were waving confederate flags, chanting Nazi-era slogans, wearing helmets and carrying shields.

world Updated: Aug 13, 2017 15:27 IST
HT Correspondent
White supremacists stand behind their shields at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, US, on Saturday.
White supremacists stand behind their shields at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, US, on Saturday.(Reuters)

Following deadly violence during a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday, Twitter users took to the social media site to decry racism by identifying the “white supremacists" present at the rally.

A car plowed into a crowd while demonstrators and protesters clashed on Saturday, killing one woman and injuring 19 others.

Twitterati began sharing photos of the white nationalists who were waving confederate flags, chanting Nazi-era slogans, wearing helmets and carrying shields near the campus of the University of Virginia campus, around the Robert E Lee statue, on Friday night.

Several people asked users to identify those in the photos and reach out to their employers in a bid to shame the white supremacists publically.

Some users managed to identify one such white nationalist as Millennial Matt who allegedly raised money online to travel to the rally in Virginia.

The driver of the car, James Alex Fields Jr, a 20-year-old who recently moved to Ohio from where he grew up in Kentucky, was charged with second-degree murder and other counts.

The “alt-Right” demonstrators gathered late on Friday and chanted “blood and soil” and “one people, one nation, end immigration” as they carried burning torches through the university campus. “Blood and soil” was a phrase commonly used by the Nazis to hail their ideas about racial superiority and traditional rural life.