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Vote tactically, says Indian-origin Brexit campaigner

Indian-origin Brexit campaigner Gina Miller has launched a funding drive to campaign for tactical voting in Britain’s mid-term election on June 8.

world Updated: Apr 20, 2017 17:40 IST
Prasun Sonwalkar
Brexit

File photo of SCM Private co-founder Gina Miller, who has launched a funding drive to campaign for tactical voting against a “hard Brexit” in Britain’s mid-term election on June 8.(Reuters)

After winning a major legal battle to force the British government to seek parliamentary approval before triggering the process to exit the European Union, Gina Miller on Wednesday launched a funding drive to campaign for tactical voting against a hard Brexit in the June 8 mid-term election.

Miller, 52, who was born to Indian-origin parents, is seeking to raise £10,000 through crowd-funding, of which more than £5,000 were quickly raised. She and her group intend to use the funds to travel around the country to support candidates who are against a hard Brexit. 

Prime Minister Theresa May announced the snap election - dubbed a “Brexit election” - on Tuesday, taking the country and the political establishment in Westminster by surprise. There were indications people would vote more according to their support or opposition to Brexit, than on party lines.

Miller said: “We will support candidates who campaign for a real final vote on Brexit, including rejecting any deal that leaves Britain worse off. We will support parliamentary candidates who commit to keeping the options open for the British people. 

“We will fight to make the Brexit deal process transparent, honest and democratic, and tour marginal seats to make sure the next government has no mandate to destroy our rights and our relationship with Europe. The future of our country is in the people’s hands.”

In January, Miller won her case seeking a direction to the government to seek parliamentary approval before beginning the Brexit process. It was later upheld in the Supreme Court. The notification to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty was sent to Brussels on March 29 after Parliament gave its approval.

The Brexit process has already begun and under the provisions of Article 50, it has to be formalised and completed within two years, by the end of March 2019. However, doubts have been expressed if the two-year timetable can be adhered to, given the complexity of the process and the need for parliaments of 27 EU member-states to ratify the final deal.