54 pc large US cos to raise staff to pre-crisis levels: survey | world | Hindustan Times
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54 pc large US cos to raise staff to pre-crisis levels: survey

world Updated: Jul 23, 2010 17:38 IST

More than half of large US firms surveyed that cut down on their staff in 2009, are planning to rebuild their workforces to get back to pre-recession levels, a survey by IT consultancy Accenture has revealed.

The survey titled 'High Performance Workforce' says 54 per cent of large businesses among the US companies surveyed by the consultancy firm, plan to hire people over the next two years to take their employee strength back to pre-recession levels.

Also, just 13 per cent of executives plan to reduce their employee base over the next 12 months, it revealed.

The survey confirmed that companies were shifting their focus away from cost control and returning to growth. The percentage of US firms focused primarily on cost control will decrease from 41 per cent in mid-2009 to 18 per cent in 2011, read the report.

"The percentage of US companies focused primarily on investment in growth-oriented activities, such as hiring, would increase from 24 per cent today to 37 per cent within the next 12 months," the survey stated.

The survey was conducted among senior executives across around 117 large businesses in the US.

However, as companies focus on growth, a shortage of high-quality skills may be a cause of concern for many businesses. Around 15 per cent of the total US executives surveyed, described the overall skill level of their workforces as industry-leading, the survey noted.

"A lack of relevant skills may present a hurdle for companies as they position themselves for growth," Accenture Talent & Organisation Performance practice managing director David Smith said.

"Companies need to rethink how they equip employees with the skills required to be competitive today. They must also consider new strategies for hiring and developing untapped talent, currently available in the market,"Smith added.