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Al Jazeera channel taps Arab anger

The protests rocking the Arab world this week have one thread uniting them: Al Jazeera, the Qatar-based channel whose aggressive coverage has helped propel insurgent emotions from one capital to the next.

world Updated: Jan 28, 2011 23:36 IST

The protests rocking the Arab world this week have one thread uniting them: Al Jazeera, the Qatar-based channel whose aggressive coverage has helped propel insurgent emotions from one capital to the next. In many ways, it is Al Jazeera's moment - not only because of the role it has played, but also because the channel has helped to shape a narrative of popular rage against oppressive American-backed governments. "The notion that there is a common struggle across the Arab world is something Al Jazeera helped create," said Marc Lynch, a professor at George Washington University.

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