As long as both sides have right intention, peace will reign on LAC: China | world | Hindustan Times
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As long as both sides have right intention, peace will reign on LAC: China

Incidents along the long border between the two countries were inevitable but as long as both sides abided by rules and regulations, peace and tranquility will reign in the disputed areas in question, China said on Tuesday. Sutirtho Patranobis reports.

world Updated: Oct 30, 2013 02:02 IST
Sutirtho Patranobis
Indo-China ties

Incidents along the long border between the two countries were inevitable but as long as both sides abided by rules and regulations, peace and tranquility will reign in the disputed areas in question, China said on Tuesday.

There has been no shooting along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) between India and China for decades and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s China visit last week would further strengthen that sense of cooperation, Huang Xilian, counsellor, South Asian department at the ministry of foreign affairs said.

Huang, who as counsellor is in-charge of Indo-China bilateral relations at the ministry, said there are problems even over a fence between two countries but because of the joint efforts of New Delhi and Beijing, the LAC has remained peaceful.

"Sometimes it is inevitable to have some kind of incidents along the border but what is important is that both sides together worked to solve it," he said replying to a question on whether the newly signed Border Defence Cooperation Agreement (BDCA) could avert incidents like the one in the Depsang valley in Ladakh in April this year when Chinese troops pitched tents inside Indian territory.

"Hyping up this issue will not help. So long both sides have intention and some mechanism as guarantor, we should be confident," Huang said during an interaction with a group of Indian journalists on Tuesday.

Before this agreement the border was peaceful and the BDCA is further guarantor of the peace tranquility, he said, adding that "we should be more confident after signing this".

Huang sounded less upbeat about the visa liberalisation issue for the Chinese, which the Indian government nixed literally hours before Singh’s China visit.

Asked whether China was disappointed that an agreement on visa liberalisation did not materialise during Singh's visit, Huang said the two countries held talks on this issue for sometime to facilitate exchange of visits.

"We should always be optimistic about future," he said, adding that China was expecting to sign at a point in the future.

The visa agreement had envisaged a much more open regime for visiting Chinese than it is currently. But it was stalled by India to send a message to China on Beijing’s policy of issuing stapled Chinese visas to Indians from Arunachal Pradesh; China claims the Indian state as its own territory and calls it southern Tibet.

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