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‘Big six’ will determine fate of the polling parties

The Big Six Senate races — Colorado, Illinois, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Washington and West Virginia — are certain to determine whether Republicans have a good night or a great one on Tuesday. In Exclusive partnership with TheWashington Post

world Updated: Nov 03, 2010 00:00 IST
Chris Cillizza

The Big Six Senate races — Colorado, Illinois, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Washington and West Virginia — are certain to determine whether Republicans have a good night or a great one on Tuesday.

It is in the Big Six races where the two national parties have placed the vast majority of money and attention over the last few days.

Colorado, where appointed Sen Michael Bennet (D) and Weld County prosecutor Ken Buck (R) are facing off, is acknowledged to be the closest race in the country.

In President Obama’s home state, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee released a poll Monday that showed state Treasurer Alexi Giannoulias (D) ahead of Rep. Mark Kirk (R) by two points. That survey showed a whopping 16% undecided — a number that suggests voters in Illinois don’t like either of their choices.

The Nevada Senate race between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D) and former state Assembly woman Sharron Angle (R) is easily the nastiest in the country and, along with Colorado, could be the closest.

In Washington State, Sen Patty Murray (D) is well-liked but most polling suggests that she and former state Sen Dino Rossi (R) are in a very close race.

The West Virginia Senate race tilts to popular Gov Joe Manchin (D) who, after a rough early October, appears to have built a mid-single-digit edge over businessman John Raese (R).

Keep an eye on the Big Six. Those half-dozen races will tell us whether Republicans are able to ride the wave or whether it crested a week or two too soon.

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