Canada to crack down on fake varsities luring foreigners | world | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 24, 2017-Tuesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Canada to crack down on fake varsities luring foreigners

The Canadian government will soon crack down on private institutions of higher learning that mislead international students, including many from India, into enrolling for expensive courses, Anirudh Bhattacharyya reports.

world Updated: Jan 15, 2013 01:20 IST
Anirudh Bhattacharyya

The Canadian government will soon crack down on private institutions of higher learning that mislead international students, including many from India, into enrolling for expensive courses.

New regulatory changes proposed by Citizenship and Immigration Canada or CIC in the International Student Programme are aimed at limiting study permits to institutions that have been “designated” by provincial and territorial governments to accept foreigners.

In a recent statement announcing the measures, Canada’s citizenship, immigration and multiculturism minister Jason Kenney said, “There are too many stories of international students who pay a lot of money and leave their families back home to study in Canada, only to find out they have been misled. These changes will help us better protect international students and the reputation of Canada’s post-secondary education system by making sure that international students are coming to quality institutions that comply with basic standards of accountability.”

Students accepted into eligible institutions will also be allowed to work part-time off-campus without applying for a work permit, an attractive proposition for students from India, who are often cash-strapped. http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2013/1/15_01-pg19a.jpg

“It’s about time they cracked down on this,” said Ravi Jain, a Toronto-based specialist in immigration law, and partner at the firm, Green and Spiegel LLP. “It’s a proposal but they’re quite serious about it. A lot of Indian students come here and they get duped when they’re going in to private colleges,” Jain said.

Mel Broitman, a director with the Canadian University Application Centre, which promotes a consortium of the country’s universities abroad, also welcomed the announcement: “Institutions feel financial pressure. They oftentimes stray down a path that is not of real integrity.”