China launches tirade against 'illegal Indian occuptation' of Arunachal Pradesh | world | Hindustan Times
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China launches tirade against 'illegal Indian occuptation' of Arunachal Pradesh

India should not to make any move that could complicate the disputed border issue between the two countries and impact bilateral ties, China has said.

world Updated: Dec 01, 2013 17:28 IST
Sutirtho Patranobis

India should not to make any move that could complicate the disputed border issue between the two countries and impact bilateral ties, China has said.

Beijing made the remark in connection with President Pranab Mukherjee’s visit to Arunachal Pradesh last week.

The comments, published in the state-run Xinhua news agency, broke the diplomatic calm over the dispute in place since People’s Liberation Army (PLA) soldiers crossed over to Indian territory in Ladakh in April and pitched tents.

The Chinese soldiers returned only after three tense weeks of negotiations.

The latest statement was in response to Mukherjee’s visit to the “so-called Arunachal Pradesh”, which China claims to be part of southern Tibet and which is under “Indian illegal occupation”.

The statement also made rare references to the Chinese version of the history of the Indian state.

“The so-called ‘Arunachal Pradesh’ was established largely on the three areas of China's Tibet -- Monyul, Loyul and Lower Tsayul currently under Indian illegal occupation. These three areas, located between the illegal "McMahon Line" and the traditional customary boundary between China and India, have always been Chinese territory,” said the strongly worded statement from the Chinese government.

It said “colonialists”, indicating the British, wrongly set up the McMahan Line in the early 20th century.

“In 1914, the colonialists secretly contrived the illegal "McMahon Line" in an attempt to incorporate into India the above-mentioned three areas of Chinese territory. None of the successive Chinese governments have ever recognised this line,” China said.

And, it added that in February, 1987, “…Indian authorities declared the founding of the so-called ‘Arunachal Pradesh’”.

China has refused to give normal visas to bureaucrats, army officers and athletes from Arunachal Pradesh on several occasions, only agreeing to issue “stapled visas”.

China's stance on the disputed area on the eastern part of the China-India border is consistent and clear, foreign ministry spokesperson, Qin Gang, said.

Bilateral ties have maintained a sound momentum for growth and both sides are trying to settle the border issue through the special representative mechanism and friendly consultations, Qin said.

“We hope India can work with China to protect the overall relationship, preserve peace and tranquility on the border,” he added.

China and India established a special representative mechanism in 2003 as an important platform for solving border disputes, holding 16 rounds of talks so far.

During Prime Minister, Manmohan Singh’s visit in October, a border defence cooperation agreement was signed “reflecting the will and resolution of both sides for a friendly and cooperative relationship.”

The agreement is built on previous agreements signed in 1993, 1996 and 2005 that recognise the principle of mutual and equal security.