Deadline over; voting to decide Nepal’s next PM | world | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Sep 20, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Deadline over; voting to decide Nepal’s next PM

Nepal President Ram Baran Yadav has asked parliament to select the country’s next prime minister by majority vote after the deadline to form a consensus government ended on Wednesday.

world Updated: Aug 25, 2011 00:48 IST
Utpal Parashar

Nepal President Ram Baran Yadav has asked parliament to select the country’s next prime minister by majority vote after the deadline to form a consensus government ended on Wednesday.

As per provision of the interim constitution, Yadav wrote to parliament to start the election process as bickering among parties over heading the next government led them to miss the 5pm deadline.

There is a tussle among Maoists, the largest party in parliament and Nepali Congress over leading the next government.

Despite several rounds of meetings among all parties over the past few days there was no consensus on Baburam Bhattarai, the Maoist candidate and Sher Bahadur Deuba, the NC contender for the PM’s post.

The fresh political crisis in Nepal started on August 7 after Prime Minister Jhalanath Khanal resigned to make way for a consensus government aimed at speeding up the peace and constitution drafting processes.

President Yadav had initially asked all parties to form a consensus government within August 21, but extended it by another three days after there was no agreement among major parties on power sharing.

With the parties failing to meet the second deadline, selection of the new PM would now be through majority vote in parliament. Since no party enjoys majority it could be another long drawn process.

Nepal had witnessed 16 rounds of voting spread over seven months after Khanal’s predecessor resigned in June last year.

Khanal, the Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist Leninist) chief, managed to get elected in February with Maoist support.

Prolonged political instability has affected the peace process as well drafting of a new constitution—both of which have to be completed within August 31—the day when the Constituent Assembly’s tenure expires.

Since these tasks won’t be completed within that deadline, the caretaker cabinet on Tuesday decided to amend the interim constitution one more time and extend the CA tenure by another three months.