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Faiz's resistance couplets on T-shirts

Daku, who launched their brand of T-shirts three years ago, have learnt to play up the political turmoil on fabric as Sab taj uchhalay jayeinge, sab takht giraye jayeinge hum dekhenge reads a Faiz couplet on a new line of "T-shirts against injustice". Read on...

world Updated: Apr 21, 2008 15:48 IST

Pakistanis have always been passionate about poetry, especially resistance poetry, and now they are flaunting legendary poet Faiz Ahmed Faiz's couplets on their T-shirts. The lyrical expression of angst is not new to Pakistanis who have the knack of throwing a couplet or two to condemn, condole or even appreciate the goings-on in life.

Sab taj uchhalay jayeinge, sab takht giraye jayeinge hum dekhenge reads a Faiz couplet on a new line of "T-shirts against injustice" by Daku. The black and white image has a man kicking a throne and raising a red flag.

Daku, who launched their brand of T-shirts three years ago, have learnt to play up the political turmoil on fabric.

Their latest series is aimed at the people's disenchantment with President Pervez Musharraf.

Shortly after the imposition of emergency last November, Faiz's two poems Hum Dekehnge and Bol became virtual national anthems for protesting civil society activists, students and lawyers.

Pakistanis love to pen poetry and their leaders are no different. Slain former prime minister Benazir Bhutto wrote one on her 50th birthday while in exile in Dubai blaming her downfall on Islamic extremists.

"My enemies wish I never was born, for them it was a torture and a shame, the first woman to head a Muslim state, crumbling centuries of control, triumphantly proclaiming the equality of men and women," she wrote.

"Our people are very fond of poetry. If you talk on any subject and start with verses, the people appreciate it and start stepping in," one of Pakistan's best known progressive poets Ahmed Faraz said recently.