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Finding Mr Perfect? It’s complicated…

world Updated: Dec 16, 2011 00:40 IST
Dipankar De Sarkar
Dipankar De Sarkar
Hindustan Times
Highlight Story

There’s not much point in looking for Mr Perfect as your life partner. He is a fabled creature: doesn’t exist, never did. So say women in a survey commissioned by Remington, the British company.

Not one — not a single one — of the 2,000 women surveyed Nov 27-Dec 3 thought there’s any such thing as the “perfect man” — most certainly not the kind that comes with scruffy facial hair. No surprises the survey was used to launch a new Remington product — the Touch Control beard and stubble trimmer. Still, it’s instructive.

These are the top 10 flaws (tick the boxes as you go along):

Not getting on with her family

Using her toothbrush
Leaving the toilet dirty
Hating her friends
Not being good with children
Being lazy
Having a big bushy beard that you never shave
Leaves nail clippings out
Driving like a boy racer
Being grumpy

A frighteningly longer list of 20 includes watching too much sport on TV, but a third of the women generously said they’d turn a blind eye to it as long as the men did what they were told to. So the survival of English football — and the IPL presumably — depends entirely on how promptly the men jump to it.

The survey undoes the damage to ego women suffered last year, when the American writer Lori Gottlieb advised women who had not found Mr Right by the age of 30 to give up, get real and settle for second best — the Mr Right Away as it were. Her book, Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr Good Enough, which blamed mass media for raising women’s expectations, was panned in Britain, where women’s lib began.

But viability’s not what women are settling for. Government statistics show the number of single women in Britain has more than doubled over the past 30 years.

Nearly a third of British women are living alone by the time they reach retirement age. They’ve been dubbed ‘freemales.’