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Finger length 'linked to financial success'

world Updated: Jan 13, 2009 12:15 IST

PTI
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Believe it or not, your financial success may lie in your finger length.

A new study by Cambridge University has revealed that people who have long ring fingers can make far greater profits than their counterparts, particularly when it comes to trading in stock markets.

Researchers have found in their study that a person's success on financial markets is influenced by biology as much as mental ability and experience.

According to them, the trait (having long ring finger) which is associated with higher exposure to testosterone in the womb is linked to attributes such as confidence, risk- taking ability, extra vigilance and quick reactions.

In fact, the researchers came to the conclusion after comparing the profits of a group of 44 traders in Britain over a period of 20 months with their finger-length.

They found the most successful traders had long ring fingers in relation to their index fingers the index finger to ring finger ratio, in fact, predicted a trader's long-term profitability as much as the number of years he's in business.

Traders with long ring fingers made up to 11 times the earnings of their counterparts. On average they made six times as much and the length of their ring finger was as influential as their experience, the study found.

"We were surprised to find that exposure to hormones in the womb had such a strong influence on future trading performance. But we should not conclude that only people with long ring fingers should be employed in the stock market.

"That is a bit like only training tennis players who are tall. It may be advantageous for their serve but that'd exclude such players as John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors," 'The Daily Telegraph' quoted lead researcher John Coates as saying.

The study has been published in the 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences'.