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'Glasgow bomb plotter left suicide note'

CNN reports that British police investigating bomb plot found a suicide note left by one of the men who rammed a vehicle into Glasgow airport.

world Updated: Jul 06, 2007 15:45 IST

British police investigating the Al-Qaeda-style car bomb attacks in London and Scotland have found a suicide note left by one of the men who rammed a vehicle into Glasgow airport,

CNN

reported.

The US broadcaster did not say where the note was found but citing sources close to the investigation, said it had been left by one of two men who rammed a Jeep into the terminal last Saturday and set the vehicle ablaze.

Police declined to confirm the report.

One of the occupants of the vehicle, who has not been named by police, was severely burned and is in critical condition in the Royal Alexandra Hospital near Glasgow.

The other occupant, named by police sources as Bilal Abdulla, an Iraqi-trained doctor, is being held with five other suspects in London.

Britain on Wednesday lowered the national terrorism threat level one notch to "severe", saying there was no longer evidence to suggest another attack was imminent.

Detectives believe they have now arrested all the main participants in the plot, which Prime Minister Gordon Brown, in office for barely a week, has said may be linked to Al-Qaeda.

Eight people are in custody, including one in Australia. Security sources say all have links to the medical profession.

Two of the suspects are Indians and the rest are from the Middle East. A security source said data on some of them appears in the MI5 intelligence agency's databases on radical Islamists.

The daily newspaper The Mirror reported that four of the suspects had met in Cambridge in 2005, suggesting the group may have been formed then.

Britain has seen a marked increase in terrorism-related plots since the September 11, 2001 strikes on the United States, and its decision to join US forces in invading Iraq in 2003.

In 2005, four young British Muslims killed 52 people in suicide bombings in London.