Greece gets one billion euros in third bailout | world | Hindustan Times
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Greece gets one billion euros in third bailout

Greece’s international creditors this week handed over a payment of one billion euros under the terms of its third bailout programme after Athens met their demands for further tough economic reforms.

world Updated: Dec 24, 2015 01:43 IST
Greece

Two other rescues since 2010 worth a combined 240 billion euros, plus a private-sector debt writedown of more than 100 billion, had failed to stabilise the economy as Athens struggled to implement the austerity measures demanded in return for fresh funding.(AP File Photo)

Greece’s international creditors this week handed over a payment of one billion euros under the terms of its third bailout programme after Athens met their demands for further tough economic reforms.

The European Stability Mechanism, the 19-nation eurozone’s bailout fund, said the funds will help Athens repay debt, balance the budget and finance projects.

“With the disbursement of one billion euros, the ESM is supporting the Greek government in its reform process,” ESM head Klaus Regling said in a statement.

“The reforms cover a wide array of policy fields that are important to modernise the Greek economy,” he said.

The Greek government had earlier this month established a privatisation fund and planned to sell a major stake in electricity distributor Admie, the latest reforms sought.

The creditors - the European Commission, the European Central Bank, the International Monetary Fund and the ESM - finalised a third Greek debt rescue programme in August worth 86 billion euros ($94 billion) after Greece looked to be on the brink of crashing out of the eurozone.

Two other rescues since 2010 worth a combined 240 billion euros, plus a private-sector debt writedown of more than 100 billion, had failed to stabilise the economy as Athens struggled to implement the austerity measures demanded in return for fresh funding.

Left-wing Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras reluctantly accepted the third debt programme but insists Greece’s debt mountain - amounting to nearly twice annual economic output - must be cut if the country is ever to stand on its own feet again.

This has divided the creditors, with the IMF saying the debt can never realistically be repaid and must be cut sharply to avoid another disaster while the Commission, the ECB and ESM say it must first adopt the reforms they say are essential to avoid any repeat.

Regling reiterated that the debt can only be addressed if Greece continues to live up to its commitments on reform.