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Hyderabad blasts: India provides information to Pak

The details of the statement made by the Pakistani national with alleged links to the banned terrorist outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba was provided to Pakistani officials during the just-concluded first meeting of the ATM in Islamabad.

world Updated: Mar 08, 2007 12:48 IST
KJM Varma

Indian officials have forwarded to Islamabad 'confessions' by a Pakistani national on his role in the 2005 bombing of the police headquarters in Hyderabad and requested for an update on the probe at the next meeting of the joint Anti-Terror Mechanism.

The details of the statement made by the Pakistani national with alleged links to the banned terrorist outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba was provided to Pakistani officials during the just-concluded first meeting of the ATM in Islamabad, Additional Secretary in the Ministry of External Affairs, KC Singh who led the Indian delegation, told reporters here.

The LeT activist, who was caught in a third country, has admitted to his complicity in the Hyderabad blast and he was subsequently deported to Pakistan, Singh said.

India requested Pakistan to probe the case based on the confessions made in a third country and provide an update in the next ATM meeting to be held in the coming three months.

Indian officials believe that the confessions in a third country could form a strong and credible case for Pakistan to probe the case. A suicide bomber allegedly triggered a blast at the police Special Task Force HQ in Hyderabad in October, 2005 killing himself and a security guard and injuring many others.

On allegations that India was helping Sindh and Baloch nationalist rebels in Pakistan, Singh said New Delhi will formally reply to the charges.

The material forwarded by Pakistan pertained to some individuals publishing periodicals expressing their views on Balochistan and Sindh, he said. "Being a free country people do express their opinions but it cannot be regarded as evidence of sponsoring revolt," he said.